News | Administration

Columbia unveils new sexual assault policy

Updated: Aug. 15, 12:08 p.m.

A new gender-based misconduct policy unveiled Friday addresses some long-held student concerns about how Columbia handles cases of sexual assault.

Changes to the policy include the removal of students from serving on hearing panels, the expansion of supporters to include lawyers, the addition of case managers as resources for students throughout the adjudication process, and mandated education for students found responsible of sexual assault and allowed to remain on campus.

The appeal process, however, remains under the purview of the dean of the respondent’s school, despite concerns from students about the deans’ training and the potential for conflicts of interest.

The policy also includes a chart on confidentiality and reporting obligations, which outlines which University officials can act as confidential resources and which are obliged to report gender-based misconduct.

Administrators said the new policy was developed based on recommendations from the Department of Education and a report from the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, as well as from concerns raised by students at town halls and meetings with administrators last year.

However, student activists released a statement Friday morning expressing concerns about the new policy. The statement—signed by activist groups No Red Tape Columbia, the Coalition Against Sexual Violence, Columbia Alumni Allied Against Sexual Assault, Title IX Team, and Take Back the Night—noted that student input was not considered when writing the policy and that a number of concerns remained. 

“It is misrepresentative for Columbia to characterize these reforms as a response to student concerns,” the statement said. “Our goal is and always has been to work with the administration ­­ including President Bollinger, Jeri Henry, and Melissa Rooker, who were central to the development of this policy­­ to address these critical concerns. Instead, we have been stonewalled, misled, and deliberately excluded from the revision process. Thus far, their refusal to meaningfully engage with students and their failure to respond to our concerns has made constructive communication impossible.”

The statement also said students were told their voices would be heard in any rewrite of the University’s policy, but that this would not take place until an executive vice president for student affairs was chosen. Ten students met with administrators on Tuesday to give feedback on the already finalized policy, according to the statement. 

The changes follow almost a year of student advocacy and national attention around the issue, including a petition to release aggregated, anonymous data on how the University adjudicates sexual assault, a federal complaint filed by 23 students alleging that Columbia violated Title IX, Title II, and the Clery Act, and a series of articles published in the Blue and White and other publications detailing students’ experiences with the adjudication process.

In February, the Coalition Against Sexual Violence submitted to administrators a list of proposed modifications to the adjudication process and to on-campus resources for survivors. Many of the changes in the new policy align with the coalition’s proposals, including expanded education and training requirements.

“The expectation is the policy will be in place for this year, but not written in stone forever at Columbia,” Suzanne Goldberg, the newly appointed special advisor to University President Lee Bollinger on sexual assault prevention and response, said in an interview. “The University is committed to shaping the policy going forward.”

Last spring, Bollinger announced the creation of a new executive vice president for student affairs position, which he said would oversee the University’s handling of sexual assault, among other issues. The position has not yet been filled, but Bollinger initially said he hoped to find someone by the fall semester.

Activists and students have also been waiting on the release of aggregate, anonymous data about the way the University handles sexual assault cases. Bollinger said in April that the “the specific manner in which aggregate data will be released” would be announced by the end of the semester.

A July 10 update on the University’s Sexual Respect website said that the data would be released in August, but a University statement released on Wednesday about the cancellation of Bacchanal’s fall concert said that the data would be published in “the near future.”

Though the 28-page policy can be read in full here, some key changes to the adjudication process, the sanctioning process, and the Office of Student Services for Gender-Based and Sexual Misconduct are outlined below.

Key changes

  • Hearing panels will now consist of three University officials, chosen from a group of around 12 formally designated student affairs administrators. These administrators will be trained on how to hear cases, and being a hearing panelist will be an official part of their responsibilities. Previously, hearing panels usually included two senior-level administrators or deans and one student.
  • Both the complainant and the respondent can now appoint any supporter of their choice, including a lawyer. Administrators said they hope to find lawyers to serve as volunteer supporters for students who cannot obtain their own lawyer. Previously, students were limited to choosing a member of the Columbia community to support them.
  • Interim measures—including changing housing assignments and contact restrictions—are now available to students from the time they request help until they graduate. The previous policy said that interim measures were available during “the investigation and until resolution of the matter.”
  • Investigators will now be able to make determinations and recommendations of credibility in their report to the hearing panel, in addition to conducting interviews with the complainant, respondent, and any witnesses.
  • Each school can now appoint a sanctioning officer who will receive trauma-informed training, in addition to training in procedure and gender-based misconduct. Sanctioning was previously the responsibility of the dean of students of the respondent’s school.
  • Students found responsible of gender-based or sexual misconduct but allowed to remain on campus, or who return to campus after a suspension or leave, will be required to complete an education program related to the gender-based misconduct violation.
  • The Office of Student Services for Gender-Based and Sexual Misconduct has been renamed the Gender-Based Misconduct Office.
  • The office has added three case managers, who will serve as a neutral point person for both complainants and respondents throughout the adjudication process.
  • The office has increased the number of Title IX investigators from two to four.
  • Bollinger’s email mentioned the creation of six new staff positions in the Office of Sexual Violence Response, which will open a second location in Lerner Hall this semester, including an assistant director at the University Medical Center.

 

Unchanged:

  • The dean of the respondent’s school will still hear all appeal cases.
  • The University will maintain its policy of not considering prior conduct violations, except in cases when the Gender-Based Misconduct Office or the respondent’s school provides the information “because the respondent was previously found to be responsible” and the “previous incident was substantially similar to the present allegation(s) and/or the information indicates a pattern of behavior by the respondent.”
  • The hearing panels will continue to use the “preponderance of evidence” as standard of proof.

 

While the new policy directly addresses some concerns that have been raised by students throughout the year, other concerns remain. Students have expressed particular concern over the role of deans in the appeal process, citing the potential for conflict of interest and whether the training they receive is adequate.

Administrators said that they will actively engage students to receive feedback on the new policy.

“The policy sets up the basic rules and procedures, but much of the work is in implementation,” Goldberg said. “And that’s where we expect students to have thoughtful suggestions for how to effectively implement what is the existing policy in addition to whatever comments they may have on the particulars of the policy.”

Check back for updates.

samantha.cooney@columbiaspectator.com  |  @sammcooney

Comments

Plain text

  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Your username will not be displayed if checked
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
Preponderance of Evidence posted on

Maintaining the Ridiculous policy! What some consider "only" one year suspension from college for those "found responsible" is quite often, in today’s academic environment, the penalty for the innocent. In most cases, if a student is found "responsible" this involves more bad judgement on his part than sexual assault) . Period!

+1
0
-1
Anonymous_New Yorker posted on

Maybe I missed it but do the new policies express penalties for professors who sex harass and/or attempt to assault and/or assault students and/or other professors? Within just the last 18 months filed in NYC courts there were 3 cases of sex harass, attempted assault and assault by Columbia U professors against students. These were either settled out of court or denied based on statute of limitations, but that there were (4) that I know of means that there are likely more; the focus seems to be on students harassing and assaulting students but the professors harassing and assaulting is just as much if not more of a problem there. Like I have been saying, when it comes to Columbia U, "Since 2004, the inmates have been running the asylum."

+1
+5
-1
alumna 2 posted on

No, nothing about professors. But if you're a male student at Columbia, your life can be ruined based on someone's word alone.

+1
+4
-1
Anonymous posted on

To 'if you're a male student at Columbia...'commenter: if what you say is true, that's a problem.

If that's true, it's as much of a problem as genuine victims of sex harass and assault being retaliated against by Bollinger Administration because we complained and asked to be transferred to different dorm, department, etc., from the person that we are accusing of the ongoing harassment and/or assault.

From perspective of accused and accusers, separation - different dorms, different departments, etc., - seems like an excellent, immediate, mutually satisfactory solution. So why hasn't Bollinger Administration enabled that separation? Why is retaliating and absolutely certainly ruining a good portion of our lives in ways that will handicap us for years to come the Bollinger Administration's preferred solution? it makes no sense. It's such a slash & burn tactic that makes no sense given all of us have offered other mutually acceptable, more productive, and less drastic alternatives.

+1
0
-1
Continuing with an Absurd Definition of Sexual Assault posted on

- Consider Columbia's extraordinarily broad definition of "sexual assault," which goes far beyond anything in the criminal justice system, in two respects.
First, the university defines sexual assault as not only rape, as understood in the criminal justice system, but also "any intentional sexual touching, however slight, with any object without a person's consent. Intentional sexual contact includes contact with the breasts, buttocks, groin, or touching another with any of these body parts, or making another person touch any of these body parts; any intentional bodily contact in a sexual manner." How many people would consider such behavior--while indefensible--to constitute rape? To Columbia, however, forcible sexual penetration and nonconsensual "sexual touching, however slight" are both "sexual assault." And the fliers suggest that the message has been received.
Second, while the university notes that sexual assault, by definition, comes without consent, it modifies this provision in a critical way: "Alcohol and other drugs can lower inhibitions and create an atmosphere of confusion over whether consent is freely and affirmatively given." Taken literally, then, any alcohol use by the female party to sexual intercourse could call into question whether a Columbia tribunal will subsequently brand a male student a rapist, since even if the female gave consent, the university claim non-consensual contact on grounds of "confusion over whether consent is freely and affirmatively given."
In this atmosphere, accused students appear to be guilty until proven innocent, even as Title IX claims suggesting that the definitions above (coupled with procedures that deny accused students the right to counsel) unlawfully act against the rights of accusers.
As colleges adopt a de facto presumption of guilt in undertaking investigations for which they are in no way competent, they will be hit with more and more of these kinds of lawsuits. And it's fair to say that the presidents and administrators of these institutions are bringing it on themselves. - K.C. Johnson

+1
+4
-1
PREPONDERANCE OF EVIDENCE AND NO DUE PROCESS posted on

Put more "trained" administrators to deal with these extremely serious issues. Way to go Columbia - you have learned NOTHING from the past mistakes. These proceedings will not prepare students for the real world in any serious way, and in order to serve as such preparation educational establishments would have to retain even more legal counsel or staff large legal departments (or that's how it looks to me). Rather than that, they handle these matters in a manner that looks vaguely superstitious - invocation of committee names and Title IX terminology as though they work magic. The hearings sound like the dances of shamanic types. It all seems to add up to something basically primitive, based on fear of women. Insofar as institutions fear women, they will wind up hating men. I hope we don't stray into a completely wrong direction -I'm afraid we're headed there now.

+1
+1
-1
anonymous posted on

or they fear The White House who imposed Title IX on them. They just can't get around it... blame the Obama administration for it

+1
0
-1
anonymous posted on

It's true that like other colleges, Columbia has its Title IX obligations. I agree that these Title IX obligations and its duty to protect victims of sexual assault as well as provide a fair hearing to those accused of sexual assault need not be in conflict. Unfortunately, recent pressure on colleges and universities from the federal government is driving many institutions, including Columbia, to enact policies that infringe on accused students’ due process rights while not necessarily making campuses any safer.

+1
+3
-1
Anonymous posted on

Yet another pointless paper writing exercise by flea-brained Bollinger. Hand rapists to NYPD and kick them out of Columbia.

+1
+5
-1
anonymous posted on

I agree 100%, hand them over to NYPD as well as those who file false accusations. But no, that's not going to happen - Bollinger is keeping his kangaroo court.

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

Right now I am looking at the Tuesday, November 23, 2004 e-mail that Bollinger sent out to CU students and staff, as well as NYC area media and politicians announcing formation of PAT Task Force specifically focused on sex assault and harassment at Columbia University. Now we have this, Bollinger's most recent commitment to 'properly' address sex assault and harassment complaints, and it doesn't look any different. Only real difference is that between November 2004 and August 2014, we have (10) years worth of additional complaints of harassment and assault AND complaints of retaliation against those victims who do complain and ask to be transferred away from it. We also know that if the complaints of harassment and attempted assault had been sincerely addressed by Columbia U, that some of the actual (v. attempted) assaults may not have happened.

In the last 18 months alone Columbia U had not just complaints of harassment and assaults by PROFESSORS against students, but maybe more troubling as far as Bollinger is concerned, is that those complaints indicate that his administration with his knowledge enabled & allowed retaliation against those who file complaints; retaliation in form of withholding transcripts so that they can not leave the school and continue their educations harassment-free elsewhere, and retaliation in form of accusing them of plagiarism, failing them, and placing false financial charges on their student records, i.e., all of these forms of retaliation from the false 'F' grades, plagiarism and the false financial charges impact these victims credit scores for several years.

Last night I met yet another victim of Columbia U retaliation. After she complained of harassment they withheld her 'certificate'. When she hired attorney, Columbia U explained that she hadn't paid her tuition. She showed receipts that she had done so. According to her, Columbia continues to withhold her certificate.

Columbia U will only get in line with NYC higher standards of prohibiting sex assault and harassment when federal funding is pulled. That needs to happen.

+1
+2
-1
I agree posted on

Good comment! I would just add that, in addition to Columbia's inadequate response to complaints of real sexual harassment they also failed students who were falsely accused. They were not allowed legal counsel and they were accused based on someone's word alone. Let's not forget - not all claims were legitimate, and not all students who were kicked off the campus were guilty. CU failed them, too.

+1
+1
-1
Anonymous posted on

That's right, CU continues to fail those who are falsely accused too.

I think that the dean CU President Bollinger assigned to my complaint said it all when he said, "President Bollinger wanted me to tell you that even if what you say is true we can't understand why it would bother you (attempted sex assault and ongoing hostile sex harassment) so much so that you aren't willing to stay here and finish your degrees." That was the explanation they gave me when explaining why CU was not releasing my transcript to school I was trying to flee from CU to.

What - from my perspective as a victim and I'm going to assume from the perspective of the professor/head of dept I wanted to transfer away from the ongoing harassment of - that 'talking head' dean of President Bollinger should have thought and said was 'we don't know if what you are saying is true but clearly there is a problem and if you are willing to transfer away from the problem to end it, thank you, good luck and goodbye." As far as I was concerned, that would have been a totally acceptable, reasonable reaction to my complaint.

That would have ended my problem totally. Admittedly, several years later, I discovered that the same professor had more sex harassment and assault complaints filed against him before and after me, so it wouldn't have ended the problem for Columbia U. But for me transferring away from CU would have = problem solved.

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

What of Female students who relish hard, wanton, kinky sex with full abandonment, then change their mind the next day and cry rape?

+1
+3
-1
Anonymous posted on

Think! Must all answers be given to you? You are a Columbia student. (Hint: think with the other head.)

+1
+4
-1
Alumna posted on

Or... consider this postmodern conundrum: two female students get drunk and have sex. The following day one of them decides she doesn't want to turn this into a steady relationship, the other one cries rape, complains to her girlfriends about the cruel treatment. Which one of them will get accused for sexual misconduct/rape and get kicked off the campus? When you have a guy in the picture - it's a no brainer for our "trained sexual harassment committees" - it's always guy's fault. How about this?

+1
-1
-1
Anonymous posted on

But one of those two female students is your mother.

+1
+5
-1
what are you? Fifth grade? posted on

for answering like that "one of those two female students is your mother". haha!

+1
+1
-1
Anonymous posted on

No. But most of us here at Columbia have 18-year-old dicks but 5th grade mental capacity. Glad you understand.

+1
-1
-1
For some people posted on

For some people, debate just isn’t good enough. Or, to put it more accurately, debate is impossible because they simply do not hold the moral or intellectual high ground. So they resort to this kind of talk and tactics.

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

Debate is irrelevant. Effective action is required. No action from Bollinger. Get that through your thick debating head.

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

A guy has just raped you. Now have a debate with the guy about it.

+1
-2
-1
No one can rape me! posted on

There is no guy that can rape me -unless he threatens me with a gun. I cannot imagine a situation in a room with a Columbia male student that would be indefensible for me. I would never just lie down and allow someone to rape me. I would use words and my own strength to push someone away. For all these women to cry rape after they're "raped" during consensual sex with someone - I don't get that! If it was that bad - why not go to the police? Why? Please don't say that they were "ashamed". I'm not buying that one minute.

+1
-1
-1
Anonymous posted on

A guy just raped you after having threatened you with the gun that you requested. Now debate.

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

That's a smart way to put it. I am not being facetious at all. I think that - as a victim I am saying this - it's the false and/or hysterical complaints of which there are certainly some that devalue genuine complaints of real - and by real I mean unavoidable - harassment and assault.

When I see women complaining about cat calls and referring to that as sex harassment or women who consent to sex and then later say they didn't really mean to say 'yes' and call that assault, it really upsets me because cat calls you can ignore and if you can say the word 'yes' to a sexual advance you can just as easily (as far as I am concerned) say the word 'no' to a sexual advance.

What can't be ignored and what constituted sex harassment and attempted assault to me included professor tried to break down door to my apartment and he had to be discouraged from continuing to push door in by two other women who, having had experience of growing up in an illegally occupied country where sexual harassment by occupying forces was continuous, would simply not back off until he went away.

It's difficult enough for those, like NYPD, who operate in the real world to take on sex harass and assault complaints, so for academics like President Bollinger and his special advisors who are too insulated and out of touch with real NYC world, it's an impossible assignment.

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

Right now I am looking at the Tuesday, November 23, 2004 e-mail that Bollinger sent out to CU students and staff, as well as NYC area media and politicians announcing formation of PAT Task Force specifically focused on sex assault and harassment at Columbia University. Now we have this, Bollinger's most recent commitment to 'properly' address sex assault and harassment complaints, and it doesn't look any different. Only real difference is that between November 2004 and August 2014, we have (10) years worth of additional complaints of harassment and assault AND complaints of retaliation against those victims who do complain and ask to be transferred away from it. We also know that if the complaints of harassment and attempted assault had been sincerely addressed by Columbia U, that some of the actual (v. attempted) assaults may not have happened.

In the last 18 months alone Columbia U had not just complaints of harassment and assaults by PROFESSORS against students, but maybe more troubling as far as Bollinger is concerned, is that those complaints indicate that his administration with his knowledge enabled & allowed retaliation against those who file complaints; retaliation in form of withholding transcripts so that they can not leave the school and continue their educations harassment-free elsewhere, and retaliation in form of accusing them of plagiarism, failing them, and placing false financial charges on their student records, i.e., all of these forms of retaliation from the false 'F' grades, plagiarism and the false financial charges impact these victims credit scores for several years.

Last night I met yet another victim of Columbia U retaliation. After she complained of harassment they withheld her 'certificate'. When she hired attorney, Columbia U explained that she hadn't paid her tuition. She showed receipts that she had done so. According to her, Columbia continues to withhold her certificate.

Columbia U will only get in line with NYC higher standards of prohibiting sex assault and harassment when federal funding is pulled. That needs to happen.

+1
0
-1
All of these posted on

Campus activist groups are so damn entitled. Not to say that the policies are good or bad, but they were created no doubt based on the recommendations of Columbia's countless legal experts and scholars. Why do student activists think their opinions must count in these sorts of legal matters? Simply claiming that their opinions weren't heard doesn't invalidate any of the new policies in any way

+1
+3
-1
Anonymous posted on

The old policies, the new policies, any future policies are not validated period. Why? Columbia students continue to be raped, and rapists continue to suffer to consequence. Bollinger just "announces", send emails, appoints search committees, plays with Mr. Happy. Reflect some, dumb ass.

+1
0
-1
Wait a second posted on

None of these cases (of rape/sexual misconduct) went before the REAL court of law. We don't even know how many of the cases reported would be judged and how many dismissed. It seems to me that many of the claims of women being raped wouldn't stand before the court of law and outside Columbia. Actually students report rape to Columbia officials and not to the police just BECAUSE the standards are lower (preponderance of evidence) they know the "assailant" will not be allowed legal counsel and will be kicked off campus immediately. But no, that is not enough for the "activists" - now they want to accuse Columbia before the Federal court of not doing enough. All they know is shout slogans - they have no real numbers, real information, all they have is the irrational fear their weak brains are feeding on.

+1
+6
-1
Anonymous posted on

They are allowed legal counsel - ok fine on that. They are not kicked out. Sometimes, Columbia collaborates on legal issues with the rapists. Columbia encourages victims not to go to NYPD or to court, because Columbia likes to protect rapists.

+1
-4
-1
you are insane posted on

No one protects rapists but Columbia sure protects criminal minds of women who file FALSE accusations, and the insane group think followers like you. Are you going to tell me that if you're raped you would wait a year before you file a complaint? And then.. you don't go to NYPD, you go to the Committee comprised of poorly "trained" administrators. You KNOW they will be on your side just because you're a woman. So how do you think Columbia is going to protect you? Obviously you know that it cannot send your "rapist" to jail because that's job for the police. No, you want your bad memory of a one-night stand to disappear, and the guys you had consensual sex with (but changed your mind) to be kicked off the campus - just because you want that to happen, and you don't want your bad memory of kinky consensual sex to remain. People used to learn from situations like these, now they call everything rape! Get a life!

+1
+2
-1
Anonymous posted on

I think you are going to be a wonderful witness for the prosecution. Your memories are detailed. Slanted the wrong way, but detailed.

+1
0
-1
to 'you are insane' posted on

'Columbia U - Bollinger Administration To Date' does in fact protect professors who have several complaints of sex assault and harassment filed against them.

'Columbia U - Bollinger Administration To Date' does direct retaliation against complainants, including withholding of transcripts so they can't transfer from Columbia U to an harassment free environment.

AND,

Columbia U also, if the New York mag article said it all, doesn't do enough to separate students who file complaints of assault (assault as far as you can claim that once you have consented to sex and then change mind about what activities that intercourse will include) and those they file complaints against. If that NY Mag article is right, then YES Columbia U Bollinger Administration is not protecting a rapist but it is very unfairly punishing a student - the student Emma Sulkowicz accuses of assault - for what seems more like youthful, bad miscommunication.

I don't know in that regard though what more Columbia U can do. What do you suggest. I'm not being facetious either. I mean what is the reasonable solution?

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

You mean that none of the 22 (and as of yesterday is it 23 or 24) that have joined Emma S's federal complaint have filed their complaints in civil courts? Because several other complainants that are NOT included in the 22/23/24 did file in civil court over last 2 years. Columbia University settled some and some were dismissed based on statute of limitations. As far as I know Columbia U did not 'win' any of them except via dismissal based on statute of limitations. The statute of limitations dismissals came about in part because a judge literally held the cases back from being adjudicated starting with the same month and year that his wife was hired to be a dean earning a bit over $100k annual in the same school within Columbia U that the professors/heads of departments accused had their offices within.

+1
-1
-1
What about posted on

the trauma of the people wrongfully accused? And... what about consequences for those who file false accusations, which are, in my mind, as criminal as any sexual misconduct. They can both ruin lives? Why is no one talking about it? Could this really be issue of men rape - women are always victims, or can we leave some space to see the other side as well? After all, women have filed false claims before, and even described how they are "raped" in detail, just so they would admit later on that was all fabricated. (google cases: Harvard, Brown, Vassar, Princeton, Columbia....). Someone has to speak out against false accusations as well, and carry posters around. But they would be booed by some, and I wonder why... and what kind of people are members of our community.

+1
+2
-1
I meant posted on

they described how they WERE Raped....

+1
+1
-1
Anonymous posted on

Admit it. You think with your dick. You always have. You always will.

+1
0
-1
Hey posted on

what can I say - it has more brain than you. At least it does't insult others.

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

It rapes.

+1
0
-1
anonymous posted on

"it rapes"

and that's where your wittiness and education ends.

+1
-2
-1
Anonymous posted on

It rapes.

+1
+1
-1
Anonymous posted on

I agree with you 100%. False accusations are as despicable as sexual misconduct. As a victim of attempted assault followed by hostile, continuous sex harassment by a CU professor and head of dept, I would say that it's those instances of false accusations that most enable assaulters and harassers - and those that for reasons I will never understand enable them - are able to defend themselves and offend repeatedly.

+1
0
-1
Concerned mother posted on

It was my dream to send both my daughter and my son to Columbia, but now that I see that the news about sexual misconduct there gets so much press even in your own Columbia Spectator, I think we are going to consider other choices. The atmosphere there seems to suck big time.

+1
+1
-1
Anonymous posted on

You are wise. You are a good father. Therefore do not risk your daughter's safety at Columbia.

+1
-4
-1
or my son's safety, I must ad. posted on

Or my son's. I would not like to subject my son to stereotyping and risk him being falsely accused.

+1
+5
-1
Anonymous posted on

I don't think anyone realizes that there are some male students who were victims of sex assault and harassment, and retaliation for filing their complaints. I am aware of at least 2 that were filed in civil courts during last several years, and both of which Columbia University 'settled'. One was filed against a Columbia University professor and head of department, and another against another male student who is also the son of a trustee.

So male students are included in the victim population, unfortunately.

+1
+1
-1
Anonymous posted on

Obviously you are very naive. Most schools are significantly worse than Columbia. Most schools just sweep crimes, rapes, cheating under the rug. Columbia is actually doing something on this issue. You would be doing your children a disservice to send them to a school in denial instead of a socially aware adult.

+1
-3
-1
Anonymous posted on

Columbia is doing NOTHING. President Bollinger sends emails, makes announcements, appoints search committees, ............ That is doing nothing. Come down to earth.

+1
-4
-1
Anonymous posted on

Well, it's better than every other school.

+1
-1
-1
Anonymous posted on

You have Columbia so far up your own ass. You are to be pitied.

+1
-6
-1
Anonymous posted on

When will people understand that there is not much Columbia can do, aside from education its students better about sexual assault. It is beyond bizarre to me that alleged victims (and their supporters) are putting so much pressure on Columbia instead of reporting assault to the police. What kind of real forensic investigation can Columbia conduct? If you say you're raped and ALL you want is that Columbia "remove your rapist from the campus" - then... I have doubts about your allegations. We have laws, and, sorry - if you say you're raped, and even though that is a terrible crime, and the process of proving it might be grueling - you still have to prove it, and it has to be beyond reasonable doubt. Because, there are so many cases of people's lives being ruined by false accusations, that this side, too, has to be taken seriously. Potential psychological and physical harm can be enormous in both cases.

+1
+5
-1
Anonymous posted on

I have news for you. Columbia University president and deans support rapists. If they want to be realistic and pragmatic, they should facilitate all cases and facts going to NYPD and New York prosecutors. But they try their hardest to keep control of the cases, and go out of their way to support the accused. They get technical and bureaucratic with the victims. I will tell you why? First and foremost they are unwilling to risk their individual careers. But also they tie their career success to the preservation of Columbia University reputation, that is too far gone anyway. And, they want to do everything to maximize alum financial contribution. Their hearts and their heads are in the wrong place. While we are at it, do you think this "unveiling" of new sexual assault policy will make any difference? They are not serious. Nobody believes that they are. They know that, but just cannot stay away from this farce, or any other farce. Meantime, campus rape victims suffer.

+1
0
-1
Don't be put off posted on

I wouldn't be put off by all this racket. If anything, it's a reflection of the lively discussions that happen at the campus. Often, it's an exercise on critical thinking, although a few of the comments here might not be all that bright. The problem being discussed here is actually happening in campi all over the country due to a more liberal sexual culture in which limits are sometimes easily trespassed. It's actually the education at home that can prevent students from getting into dangerous situations that can put them at risk. And by that, I mean men and women alike. They need to learn how to respect the opposite sex, and no to send the wrong signals. The problem for the university administrations (by that I mean not only at Columbia) and the police departments, is that there aren't enough grounds for most of the accusations. Most of these incidents could have been avoided if the students involved (both presumed victims and presumed criminals) had been more prudent in the first place.

So in summary: If you're children are leaving home, be sure they are prepared to avoid possible dangerous situations. This may happen anywhere.

The main question meanwhile will be, as usual, if they are admitted to the college of their choice. Good luck with that!

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

This is all an easy fix. If you feel you have been assaulted, go to the police. If you feel you have been wrongly accused, lawyer up and sue. This is the best solution. Columbia cannot be expected to be your momma.

+1
+9
-1
Anonymous posted on

COLUMBIA PROTECTS RAPISTS.

+1
-11
-1
Anonymous posted on

Why do you say that? You know that's not true. You look foolish saying that.

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

It is true. Can't help it if you think it's foolish.

+1
-4
-1
Anonymous posted on

Actually what you are required to do as a complainant is to bring the complaint to the institution 1st. Before court will accept jurisdiction of your complaint You have to show that you have exhausted all 'local remedies. The legal system isn't your, as you put it, 'your momma' either.

This requirement has been used by Bollinger's Columbia University to run out the statute of limitations clock.

What I recommend to other victims is that while you are processing complaint within Columbia U, you are simultaneously working with outside legal counsel.

+1
-1
-1
Anonymous posted on

Why are so many trolls allowed to comment on these Columbia sites. They spread false, untrue, slanderous and malicious information. They should be blocked.

+1
+2
-1
Anonymous posted on

O wese troll fom Ferguson. Sorry Massah. Now block us.

+1
+3
-1
anonymous posted on

slanderous? just because they think differently than you that doesn't mean their comments are malicious!

+1
-2
-1
Yep! posted on

That's where we are at this IVY league institution - GROUP THINK! We should all admit that rape is RAMPANT at Columbia, if not we can be accused of being pro rape. Never ending Idiocy!

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

You are a dramatic little shithead. Members of Columbia community have been raped by other members. Nothing is done about it, and sometimes Columbia obstructs legal due process. ("Unveiling" new policy does not count for diddly squat.) Therefore rapes continue. They are frequent. Enough Columbia students take this lightly. Perhaps they are rampant. Perhaps not. The only people who must admit to anything are the rapists themselves. You as a blogger do not have to admit to anything, unless you yourself are a rapist. Now as for Bacchanal, open wide and suck it up (and again, admission of your own stupidity is not required).

+1
-3
-1
lol posted on

and who's being dramatic here? You or he/she?

+1
0
-1
This is Gender Profiling Policy! posted on

This was and it remains a Gender Profiling Policy!

+1
+3
-1
Anonymous posted on

Six students asked for it, and twenty eight thousand will now pay for it. Student activism too loud and gone all wrong.

+1
+2
-1
Anonymous posted on

Enough on this topic already. The policy is in place. Spec is the reason why Bacchanal is cancelled because they over sensationalized and overwrote on this topic. It made it seem like the globe was being taken over by teenage rapists. This has taken the discussion way too far.

+1
+3
-1
Anonymous posted on

You are right. Stop the discussion. Expel the rapists. Announce the expulsions publicly. Put it permanently on their Columbia University transcripts. Include the transcripts in all recommendations that Columbia professors send to other colleges, or grad schools, or professional schools, or prospective employers.

+1
-5
-1
Anonymous posted on

That is basically what is already done. I would also add expell anyone who makes false or inaccurate statements or false accusations. That is currently not done.

+1
+1
-1
Anonymous posted on

It is not done.

+1
-3
-1
Food for thought posted on

" An Alarming National Trend - False Rape Allegations " by Eugene J. Kanin, Ph.D.

https://archive.org/details/FalseRapeAllegations

Psychologist Eugene J. Kanin, Ph.D., indicated that as many as 41% of reported rapes are false, with "victims" making false accusations for one of three reasons: to seek revenge, provide an alibi, or obtain sympathy and attention. 59% were real victims. That's almost the equal number of victims on both sides.

+1
+1
-1
Anonymous posted on

59 does not equal 41. If you are going to cite a PhD, you should have some brain yourself.

+1
-3
-1
Anonymous posted on

You should read the previous post more carefully and try not to offend - it says "almost equal", and all it does is says that the other side should be heard, too. If you don't agree with that, then, why is that?

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

Thanks for stating the obvious. But we are not talking about that, in case you have not read a single thing on this blog.

+1
0
-1