News | Student Life

Frustrated by Columbia’s inaction, student reports sexual assault to police

  • Steven Lau / Senior Staff Photographer
    Police Report | Emma Sulkowicz, CC ’15 and one of the 23 students who filed a federal complaint against the University for violations of Title IX, Title II, and the Clery Act, filed a police report on Wednesday against the student who allegedly raped her in August 2012.

Warning: This article contains graphic descriptions of sexual assault.

Emma Sulkowicz has had enough. 

As the movement against sexual assault on campus continues to grow, Sulkowicz, CC ’15, has decided to take matters into her own hands by filing a police report against the Columbia student who allegedly raped her a year and a half ago.

Sulkowicz went to the police after finishing her final exams on May 13 and filed the report early in the morning on May 14.

The man named in the report as Sulkowicz’s alleged attacker is Jean-Paul Nungesser, CC ’15. Nungesser’s name appeared in the list of four “rapists on campus” found on bathroom walls and on printed flyers around campus this past week

According to the police report, Sulkowicz had had consensual sex with Nungesser twice before the alleged rape. Sulkowicz said that on the night of Aug. 27, 2012, she and Nungesser started to have consensual sex again, when suddenly things changed.

According to the report, Nungesser “hit her [Sulkowicz] across the face, choked her, and pushed her knees onto her chest and leaned on her knees to keep them up.” He then “grabbed [Sulkowicz’s] wrists and penetrated her anally.”

Sulkowicz reported to police that she told Nungesser to stop, but that he did not. She “struggled with [Nungesser] and tried to push his arms away,” according to the police report, but “[Nungesser] kept going and suddenly stopped without ejaculating.”

Sulkowicz said that she didn’t want to report her attack to the police because she was embarrassed and ashamed of what had happened to her.

“When it first happened, I didn’t want to talk to anyone. I didn’t even tell my parents. ... I didn’t even want to talk to my best friend,” she said.

Sulkowicz decided to file a complaint against Nungesser through the University when she met two other women he allegedly assaulted. “I realized that if I didn’t report him he’d continue to attack women on this campus. I had to do it for those other women,” Sulkowicz said. 

After Sulkowicz reported her assault to Columbia in April 2013, the University ultimately found him “not responsible”—the same decision it later gave the two other women who filed complaints against him, Sulkowicz said. 

The University declined to comment for this story, and Nungesser did not respond to request for comment.

Because Columbia uses “preponderance of evidence” as the standard of proof when adjudicating cases of sexual assault and gender-based misconduct, a hearing panel must be convinced that a policy violation is “more likely to have occurred than to not have occurred” in order to find a student responsible, according to the University’s policy.

This is the standard of proof that the Department of Justice and the Office for Civil Rights say colleges should use when adjudicating cases of sexual assault, but Sulkowicz said she still feels her case was decided incorrectly.

If Nungesser is charged by the New York County District Attorney’s Office, the standard of proof—as in any criminal case—will be “beyond a reasonable doubt,” a much higher standard than “preponderance of evidence.”

Spectator has reached out to the NYPD for comment on the status of the investigation into Sulkowicz’s complaint. An NYPD spokesperson said how these sort of complaints are handled varies on a case-by-case basis.

Sulkowicz said she doesn’t know for certain what the police will do next but that police told her they would be putting a district attorney on the case.

“I understand if it’s too late, but I really hope he does [get charged],” she said.

Sulkowicz’s story has been picked up by national media outlets from CNN to ABC, and last month she spoke about her assault at a press conference with New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand. After being featured in two recent New York Times articles, Sulkowicz noted that many of the comments on the pieces seemed to wonder that she had not reported her alleged rapist to a higher authority at the time. 

“People kept making comments like, ‘Girls are so dumb, they should just go to the police. Obviously the school isn’t going to deal with it.’ I wanted to see for myself if I should have gone to the police,” Sulkowicz said. “I figured maybe they have a point. Maybe his name should be in the public record,” Sulkowicz added, referring to her alleged attacker. 

Sulkowicz, whose name appears on the police report as “Emra Suhkowicz” due to a spelling error by the police, says the experience of filing the report is not one she wants to repeat.

“There’s a reason survivors choose not to go to the police, and that’s because they’re treated as the criminals,” she said. “The rapists are innocent until proven guilty but survivors are guilty until proven innocent, at least in the eyes of the police.”

Sulkowicz said she felt badly mistreated by the officers who came to her residence to take her statement. Because she and Nungesser had had consensual sex twice before he allegedly assaulted her, Sulkowicz said the police were dismissive of what she had to say.

“He emphasized certain things, like the fact that I had consented earlier on in the night,” Sulkowicz said of the officer to whom she told her story.

“And I said, ‘Yeah, but then he [Nungesser] started strangling me and I definitely didn’t consent to that.’”

Sulkowicz said the officer asked repeatedly about what clothes Nungesser was wearing at the time and was surprised when Sulkowicz couldn’t remember specific details from the incident, which occurred more than a year and a half ago.

“He [the officer] was like, ‘So you don’t remember what shoes he [Nungesser] was wearing? Oh. Most women do,’” Sulkowicz said.

From her residence hall, Sulkowicz was driven to the local precinct offices, where she was asked to fill out forms describing her assault as domestic violence—despite the fact that she and Nungesser were never in a relationship—and questioned by a detective from the Special Victims Unit.

During that time, she said, the policeman to whom she originally gave her statement was standing outside the room, actively dismissing her story to the friends she had brought to the precinct office with her for support.

“They told me he said stuff like, ‘Of all of these cases, 90 percent are bullshit, so I don’t believe your friend for a second,’” Sulkowicz said.

Sulkowicz said that the officer also repeatedly emphasized to her how “painful” the process of investigating her alleged assault would be and how much it would “hurt” her.

“It makes perfect sense why a survivor wouldn’t go to police the moment after she’s been physically violated,” she said. “If all the police are doing is stressing she’s going to suffer more, it’s unimaginable.”

Sulkowicz said this is why Columbia needs to be improving its own adjudication process for sexual assault. She, like many activists on campus, is happy to see Columbia making policy changes like those outlined in the statement released Thursday by University President Lee Bollinger. Sulkowicz said she was especially glad to see the addition of a second location for the Rape Crisis/Anti-Violence Support Center in Lerner Hall, which is accessible to all students on campus.

The RC/AVSC’s move, as well as the announcement that it will now provide round-the-clock counseling from a trained professional in addition to the existing peer counseling system, is one of many changes student activists have been pushing for all year. 

The most recent round of student activism has taken the form of the lists of alleged rapists posted in bathrooms around campus, which has also gained national media attention.

“That’s still a problem. The fact that the University sends Public Safety to tape down the bathrooms—I think that’s a stifling of sorts,” Sulkowicz said, referring to the University’s response to the lists. Most of the written lists were wiped away soon after they were discovered, and Facilities put tape across several bathrooms in Butler Library while removing the names. 

“For other graffiti they wouldn’t tape the bathroom down. If it were a drawing of a smiley face, they wouldn’t do that.”

Columbia does not comment on specifics of sexual misconduct cases, but the University issued a statement earlier this week in response to the lists of alleged rapists. “The University is mindful of the multiple federal laws that govern these matters and provide important protections to survivors of sexual violence and to students engaged in our investigative process. These laws and our constitutional values do not permit us to silence debate on the difficult issues being discussed,” the statement said.

Some students and online commenters have raised concerns that by publicizing the names of these alleged “rapists on campus,” activists are disrespecting the named students’ privacy by spreading unconfirmed information. Sulkowicz says that because she knows women who have allegedly been attacked by the men on the list, she views the situation differently.

For her, and many others, the University’s policy changes are a step in the right direction, but have done little to address individuals’ concerns about running into their alleged attackers on campus.

“At the end of the day, my rapist still goes to this school and they haven’t done anything about that,” Sulkowicz said. “What good is all this if I know my serial rapist is still going to be attacking women on campus?” 

emma.bogler@columbiaspectator.com  |  @ebbogz

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And here is a real step posted on

Incredible brave of her to do this. Puts names in open, highlights problems with police treatment of victims, (What Kirsten Gillibrand should really be pushing on the city for) and provides concrete facts about her assault. While Columbia could certainly have better procedures, as a normative matter it is hard to see how a college is equipped to be better at dealing with crimes than a Court in the abstract. School proceedings are useful due to their preponderance of the evidence standard, but the most outraging part of this article should be the failure of our criminal justice system to balance "innocent until proven guilty" alongside the validity of the victim's account.

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Anonymous posted on

Kristan Gillibrand went to Dartmouth, the drunk and rape capital of the US. She should try to work on her own school first.

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Anonymous posted on

Emma Sulkowicz | Emra Suhkowicz (on NYPD Report) - Lying to conceal the truth?

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Anon posted on

Okay seriously what is your obsession with this notion that she LIED about her OWN NAME on a police report that she VOLUNTARILY filed? What would she be trying to cover up? She has been publicly speaking about this case for like a semester now, she's chosen to be identified with it. She's given public comments and been interviewed on national television. Why would she purposefully write it incorrectly in a police report?

And more importantly, we are you literally obsessed with suggesting that she did? I don't think anyone is buying this... what's you point here?

It really makes you seem like a crazy person to keep asserting all over these comments that she intentionally misspelled her own name. Seriously crazy, or seriously involved....

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Anonymous posted on

This post is well-put and balanced. Columbia's institutional failures in addressing sexual abuse, protecting its students, and investigating the accused are well-documented, both by campus publications and the broader press. But commentators here and elsewhere are moving dangerously close to equating the accused with the guilty. One requires a statement, the other, proof. We as a community must think long and hard about sexual abuse, and what it means if both the university and the courts find someone not guilty. Should there be consequences for those who make public accusations that result in not guilty, but in the process ruin the accused's life? Should those distributing anonymous flyers that equate accusations of sexual offense with guilt also go unpunished, if such accusations prove false? Do we, as a community, bear at least some responsibility to to choose our words judiciously, recognizing that we must not, in our struggle to protect future victims of sexual abuse, terrorize the innocent accused, while bringing justice to the guilty.

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false accusations are rampant posted on

If you are really interested in what's going on and how this witch hunt is not helping real victims of sexual abuse, nor the falsely accused men, please read this article. Universities' hands are tied - they are not capable of dealing with such cases.
http://durhamwonderland.blogspot.com/2014/05/due-process-and-duke.html

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Ben posted on

Emma, you are so brave. I'm proud to be your classmate.

And the police's misspelling of Emma's name is like a scene out of a farce. If I'd read that in the Onion, I'd have thought the writers were being too heavy-handed.

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Anonymous posted on

Ben you're an idiot. NYPD is very accurate in how they take down data. Mispronouncing a name is what she did. Reason? Searching name on NYPD report won't reveal her real name. Both of you are a disgrace to Columbia.

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No posted on

If you believe that the NYPD is "very accurate in how they take down data," then you can't also believe they try to spell names based on how they they hear them. Emma has said below that she provided her driver's license so the police could copy her name off it.

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So... posted on

JP is "Tom"??? :O

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Anonymous posted on

I'm happy for Ms. Sulkowicz for finally reporting to police, but this is clearly a 'symbolic' gesture. Are we really blaming the police for seeming a bit dismissive, if they are trying to file a report and she cannot recall many details of the night, and has no physical evidence, and the school itself has already dismissed the case? Unfortunately, these things must be reported immediately. It's a shame that many rapists get away with it, but courts rightfully demand hard evidence before locking someone behind bars and exposing him as a rapist. Still, I commend Emma for her bravery.

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Anonymous posted on

That's a real backhanded "commendation" there, anon. Did you really not read the things they said to her? That's not "a bit dismissive," it's flat out looking for things to use against someone who's coming to them for help. It absolutely blows my mind how the same people who bleat "go to the police!" on all these articles then downplay the very real and painful experience that reporting to the police almost always is for survivors. If you really want to help, listen and validate her story and ask how you can best support her. It's really not that hard and it makes all the difference.

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Anonymous posted on

NYPD probably wanted to keep this report out of their COMSTAT figures. Jerks!

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You are part of the problem posted on

Maybe if you had been restrained and violated in the manner that she was you might not remember the TYPE OF SHOES you attacker was wearing. I have a feeling she was a bit preoccupied and scared for her life to hold onto those kinds of details.

And for the record, it's not "many" rapists that get away with it. It is nearly ALL rapists. 97 percent of all rapists walk free.

This kind of skeptical attitude is EXACTLY why 54 percent of women do not report their assaults.

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Uhhh posted on

To be clear, is "the problem" that I am assaulting people? that I somehow can control how police file their reports? that I insist that a court of law demands physical evidence? I'm sure you've never filed a police report, but these things are extremely thorough, for all sorts of crimes.

PS. that 97% statistic, which is already a bit misleading (including/especially because the vast majority of people don't report assaults, as you say, but they are included in that statistic), is only serving to dissuade people from reporting to the police and try to put criminals in jail. Would you rather these police reports WEREN'T thorough? because, in case you didn't realize, the police submit these reports as evidence to help the VICTIMS. It is a jury, not the police, who adjudicate these cases, so all pieces of information are helpful. But whatever, I'm just a problem-making rape apologist for encouraging victims to report crimes to the police.

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Maybe it's time for a reality check posted on

Emma was brave to do this, and as described, her attacker sounds like a menace. Of course, with a "beyond a reasonable doubt" standard, he is even less likely to be found guilty than in the university proceeding, and therefore probably won't be charged.

Emma is not to blame for her attack. But doesn't part of the blame lie in the casual hook-up culture and drinking-to-get-drunk culture that a significant proportion of college students take for granted? And which promote an "anything goes" and "sex - and extreme sex - is no big deal" attitude? Obviously the law has not caught up to that culture, as the police labeled Emma's attack as "domestic violence" even though she insists (and Spectator agrees) that she was never in a relationship with the attacker despite the fact that she had consensual sex twice before and the event of that day started out as consensual.

The attacker never should have become violent or committed acts she did not want. She never asked for that. Both men and women have to realize that a casual sex culture does not mean a license to violate someone's limits. But partaking of that culture also means that juries and law enforcement may well give the alleged attacker the benefit of the doubt depending on the circumstances.

In an ideal world, intelligent men and women like thaose at Columbia would droink only enough to provide a "social lubricant", but not so much as to lose their common sense.

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to answer your question posted on

nope nope nope nope nope nope nope nope nope nope nope nope nope

fuck you for pretending to be sympathetic before rehashing the same tired victim-blaming speeches that have been tossed around for years and literally change NOTHING

the only way to prevent rape is NOT TO RAPE SOMEONE

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Anonymous posted on

It's not victim-blaming. Nowhere in the post did he or she ever state it was Emma's fault (in fact, at one point it's stated that it is *not* the victim's fault). The statement instead is talking about the cultural norms that complicated handling of this situation - specifically that the law does not define well enough the delineation between a domestic dispute and a rape, and that law and general society understand a relationship (particularly marriage, but also relationships) as a form of implied consent.

This is erroneous - a married women still needs to give consent to her husband, but the law (or at least the enforcement of the law) may sometimes operate with that presupposition. That particular presupposition is what the commenter calls out - because there was a preexisting relationship of some kind (in the form of previous encounters rather than an official relationship) the nature of the crime in the eyes of police is different. This is absolutely due to hookup culture and the law's inability to differentiate between casual hookups and a real relationship, and rape and domestic violence. Nowhere does the commenter even say that the way the law treats it is *right* (it isn't) but instead ascribes a potential reason for the improper handling.

I hate hate hate that rational discussion is drowned out by immediate vitriolic response. Even if someone is wrong, and it's victim blaming, explain to them why it's victim blaming and you're much more likely to get them to understand why it's a crock of shit. If you scream and shout, you teach people to instead bottle up their thoughts. They then don't get the opportunity to express their thoughts, and refine their beliefs by hearing from people with different opinions, and they're more likely to keep on believing the things they do, but just in private.

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Anonymous posted on

You learned how to curse!!! How effective to evade the concept of innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. Wonder how you got into Columbia.

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Nadia posted on

No, "hook up culture" and alcohol does not deserve part of the blame. Think about it. Most women who drink aren't getting sexually assaulted. The VAST majority of men on campus drink and are NOT rapists.

If alcohol and casual sex was the 'factor' that 'caused' men to rape, then wouldn't every guy who was drinking be raping women? This idea that men will turn into rapists once they've had a few shots assumes a very predatory, outdated notion of men that is sexist and extremely insulting. And it's wrong. Most men are not rapists. But the ones who ARE raping women (we're talking about FOUR percent of the college population, who commit around 90-95% of rapes) are doing it...over and over again. Most rapists are serial offenders, who target vulnerable victims. Alcohol is used as a tool of rape, and research has shown that many men will also consume it before they sexually assault someone to make it easier AND to provide a justification for their behavior (Lisak 2002, McWhorter 2009, Graham 2014).

Rape is a pre-meditated, calculated crime people. The rates of sexual assault hasn't changed at universities for the last 30 years. Clinging on to sensationalist taglines like "hook up culture" and "alcohol" to make it seem like rape is a 'new thing' is ridiculous. We aren't going to solve this issue until we get to the real cause of rape -predators, rape culture that supports predators getting away with their crimes, and lack of institutional support for survivors and accountability for rapists.

For more information, read here: http://thinkprogress.org/health/2013/10/29/2844951/link-alcohol-sexual-assault/

p.s. I really encourage people to do their research before they decide to comment on such a sensitive topic. Stating opinions that resort to victim blaming can seriously trigger readers, especially survivors, many of whom are living with PTSD and for whom an ignorant comment can set off a panic attack.

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Anonymous posted on

The attitude expressed in the postscript is appalling.
It is Victorian prudery translated into 21st-century psychobabble.
Back then, they would have said, "Do take care not to offend a lady's delicate sensibility -- or she may suffer a fainting spell!"
Women are liberated now! They have the confidence and the fortitude to hold their own in an argument. They don't need to be protected from contrary opinions.

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um posted on

No, it's not about women being too delicate to handle it. It's about the fact that many survivors and victims of sexual assault—and they span all genders, races, and creeds—retaining various forms of PTSD after an incredibly traumatizing experience. Just because trigger warnings originated in the sexual assault movement doesn't mean they aren't applicable to a lot of content that can set off a person's psychological fear response, if you think about it.

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ding dong, you're wrong posted on

No. That is such bullshit. There's no fucking way I'm going to hold my opinions in because someone might have a panic attack if they hear me expressing my opinion. I don't care if they were raped by Satan himself, if talking about it turns them into a babbling pile of trauma, they need to see a doctor because they AREN'T CAPABLE OF RATIONAL DISCUSSION OF THE ISSUE. Nobody should have to censor their thoughts on the off chance someone can't take them. Let's also be careful of the very subtle implication that if what you say sends a PTSD rape victim into a relapse, what you said is automatically wrong. That's a fucking fallacy right there.

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Psych posted on

"Trigger warnings are designed to help survivors avoid reminders of their trauma, thereby preventing emotional discomfort. Yet avoidance reinforces PTSD. Conversely, systematic exposure to triggers and the memories they provoke is the most effective means of overcoming the disorder. According to a rigorous analysis by the Institute of Medicine, exposure therapy is the most efficacious treatment for PTSD, especially in civilians who have suffered trauma such as sexual assault."

http://www.psmag.com/navigation/health-and-behavior/hazards-ahead-problem-trigger-warnings-according-research-81946/

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Anonymous posted on

How many drinks can you have before its okay for some sicko to rape you? The rapist is to blame for rape. You take the rapist out of the equation and there's no rape.

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Anonymous posted on

That does not make sense.Victims all the time use the excuse that they were too drunk to consent, it also follows that the assailants can also use the same excuse they were too drunk to know what they were doing. Drinking is bad.

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FTP posted on

If the report is a matter of public record, does that mean this officer's name is as well?

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Anonymous posted on

yes

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Anonymous posted on

Emma, thank you for being so brave and for helping to make our campus a safer place by not giving up. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

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Anonymous posted on

Emma - lying about your name - how do we know you weren't lying about the rape?

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Edward White posted on

Which is more likely - she lied about her name, or they misspelled it? Obviously, her name is difficult to spell, unlike mine. If she wanted to lie about her name, wouldn't she have given a totally different name?

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thank you for being brave posted on

bullshit!

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Anonymous posted on

I'm confused as to what Miss Sulkowicz wanted the university or the police to do vis a vis Nungesser. There is literally no evidence linking him to her crime. Should they find him guilty based on her word alone?

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Anonymous posted on

Fuck off.

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Anonymous posted on

Why should I fuck off? That's a very legitimate question, and you clearly have no answer.

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Anonymous posted on

It is a legitimate question, and I don't know why any rational person would tell you to fuck off.

The answer is: the police won't be able to do anything. There is no conceivable way that the courts could find him guilty beyond reasonable doubt, especially seeing as there is no physical evidence of the assault whatsoever.

However, it does allow his name to be put on the public record, which is a legal way for Emma to disclose his identity, and help the rest of the community know who he is, and shun/avoid him as necessary.

This was extraordinarily brave of you Emma. Here's hoping his now outed-identity, and the shame and repudiation he will undoubtedly receive from his classmates, will force him to leave the university of his own accord.

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Anonymous posted on

Because TWO OTHER WOMEN told the same story, asshole. And Columbia still threw up their hands. STFU, rape-apologist.

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Anonymous posted on

No, the two other women told quite different stories; both were troubling but neither could be remotely described as rape. Only Emma Sulkowicz has made that allegation.

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Anonymous posted on

Communist Leftist Swearing reveals your lack of an Education

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Questioning these rape allegations is OK posted on

and it doesn't mean that people who question are condoning rape. Filing charges after 2 years..... well, you can expect that questioning will be thorough and tough. Otherwise everyone could be ruined based on someone's word alone. Sorry, but justice doesn't work that way! This is pure witch hunt and most of you are acting irrationally.

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so when you say posted on

fuck off to someone who asks questions, what does that say about you? What kind of person are you that you are not capable of defending your argument with better words? I'll tell you why - because you and NO argument. You're part of the hysteria that will harm all of us. Grow up.

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CC15 posted on

You have no idea whether she has any evidence--that isn't discussed in the article. I don't know where you got the idea she has zero evidence. I'm also assuming that she wouldn't detail in an online campus forum the evidence she was planning to use against her rapist, so that his army of lawyers could use it to AGAIN thwart her attempts at justice (he is from a rich international family and will undoubtedly bring in a storm of legal advice for this trial, just like they did in the University hearing process.)

He's really a sick son of a bitch and I truly hope he gets what coming for him.

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Kelly Moore posted on

You say "based on her word alone," but there is more evidence than that. Emma suffers the effects of being raped -- she has the signs and symptoms that constitute the "wound" that rape victims are left with. We can verify that she was traumatized, victimized, and her testimony provides credible evidence of the details of that trauma, including the man who inflicted it upon her. Why is her testimony inherently untrustworthy to you, simply because this crime is masked in the costume of sex? I am sure the police could also still obtain corroborative evidence, in the form of witness accounts, that show the two were together, that put the rapist at the scene of the crime, as well as pattern evidence showing that this piece of dung has done it before. "He said/she said" is an out-of-date all-purpose excuse for continuing the terrorism of rape.

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There are many cases posted on

where women described in detail how they were raped just to admit months later that all they said was fabricated. Now, only Emma and the guy she slept with (consensually!) know what happened. Emma has signs and symptoms... really? Has she been in therapy or have those signs emerge just recently?

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Anonymous posted on

She must file against Bollinger, all the deans, and campus police too, for aiding and abetting.

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The Turk posted on

The rape epidemic in Columbia, and in college campuses in general, is appalling. Coercing someone into sexual intercourse is a vile form of physical and emotional abuse and it is a shame that PrezBo is managing this crisis so poorly.

I fully empathize with Ms. Sulkowicz and I am strongly inclined to believe her story because similar claims have been made about Mr. Nungesser by other women as well. It is likelier that he indeed is a sexual offender than that Ms. Sulkowicz and the two other unnamed women are in cahoots in a grand conspiracy against Mr. Nungesser.

With that said, however, I do believe that being dismissive about the "hook-up culture" is not helpful. When Emily Joffe wrote this on Slate, so-called feminists tore her apart but if intoxication or being sexually forward is rendering a young woman vulnerable to sexual predation -which I believe does-, trying to keep the hookup culture a taboo and calling anyone who raises the issue sexist is not helpful.

Let's be realistic. Rapists rape. They always have, they always will. We cannot pretend that there is a panacea that could somehow eradicate sexual aggression, there is none. Proving rape once it happens is more difficult than predicting and pre-empting rape before it happens. College presidents across America are having trouble handling rape cases not because they are vile sexists giving cartes blanche to sexual aggression. There are serious legal liabilities attached to unfairly expelling some from a college, let alone the reputation risks. Without conclusive proof, all is presumed innocent and the very nature of sexual intercourse making it really difficult to have prove consent. Sexual intercourse, consensual or non-consensual, often happens away from the public eye. It happens at the intimacy of a dorm room, a frat house, a car ride; not on Low Plaza.

Don't get me wrong; rape never is and never can be the victim's fault. Rape, however, is prevented by pre-empting it, by not making yourself a target for sexual predation. To say that rape is prevented by not raping is no different than saying that the solution to drunk driving is not to drink and drive. Drunks drink, rapists rape. If drinking renders you incapable of driving, you hail a cab. If drinking renders you vulnerable to sexual predation, you drink in moderation. That's the solution; neither to binge drink so that you cannot drive even if you wanted or be a teetotaler.

If a world with a bit less booze, cleavage, casual flirting is going to be a world with less women abused, I would be fine with it and so should you. I'd rather endure sobriety than the horrors of seeing a loved one being a victim of sexual predation. Those evangelizing the hookup culture don't realize that they are abetting the rape culture.

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Anonymous posted on

It should be pointed out that, according to the story in the Blue & White, the claims made by the other two women against "Tom" (presumably Mr. Nungesser) were quite different and much less shocking than Ms. Sulkowicz's. One of them said she was involved in a relationship with "Tom" that was emotionally manipulative and hurtful. The other said that he grabbed her in a basement at a party and tried to kiss her.

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Nadia posted on

If you look up David Lisak's research, you will find that the majority of serial rapists admit to other forms of violence, including domestic abuse, child abuse, sexual battery, and lesser forms of sexual assault, including coercion. Not every rapist can get away with raping every time. But if someone is accused of rape by one person and accused of lesser forms of sexual assault by other people, then that is in fact a strong indicator that this is a predatory individual who will use whatever tools he has at his disposal to get what he wants sexually. And keep in mind...these were the victims we have heard from. I'm sure there are others out there.

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are now we going to call guys rapists posted on

if they're emotionally manipulative? Are women that incapable of moving on after having been with someone who is emotionally manipulative, that they have to brand them as "rapists" and trying to ruin their lives? They need protection from the State and the entire community? What is this? This is total insanity. This overcorrection is going to hurt everyone.

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Anonymous posted on

This comment has been deleted as per Spectator's comment policy.

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Anonymous posted on

A person can say "no" AT ANY POINT. It doesn't matter if it's the 1st time the two have had sex or the 100th time. It doesn't matter if the two are in a relationship. If someone says "no" and sex continues, that's rape. You're an ignorant prick. But perhaps I'm the ignorant one, for believing that assholes who call brave women "sluts" and victim shame were a thing of the past.

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Anonymous posted on

Saying "No" the day after is probably what really happened. After all Emma Sulkowicz | Emra Suhkowicz can't tell her real name when it's Public Record.

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Anonymous posted on

Hi Jean-Paul! Bet it sucks knowing your name is out there, for all the world to see. Rapist. Raaaaapist. That's you! Jump when you hear that, frog. And when you finally get arrested and prosecuted and sent to prison, YOU'LL know what it's like to be on the other side, and maybe learn some compassion for victims of sexual assault. You know what I mean, right? Sure you do. Don't drop the soap, son.

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Activist posted on

Just want to respond to this gross comment on behalf of the student activists who are actually working to end sexual violence on campus, alongside Emma: We would absolutely NOT condone sexual violence within the prison system, nor ever wish such misery on anyone (even a truly fucked up person like JP).

Ending sexual violence on campus means working in meaningful solidarity to end sexual violence in other institutions as well--including the prison system--and dismantling the systems of power and oppression that are at its root.

I sincerely hope that JP gets the justice Emma and other survivors feel he deserves, but am confident this does not mean escalating or perpetuating violence.

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Anonymous posted on

Dittos from another activist.

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Anonymous posted on

Wow, I'm a human, and I can see the things you're writing. That was one of the meanest things I've read so far. I just felt my stomach drop.

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Anonymous posted on

Emra Suhkowicz - love how she misspelled her name so NYPD search won't reveal her real name. Women at Columbia are such two faced liars. Sex one night. Next morning they say its rape. Virgin conscience.

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Anonymous posted on

IS THIS REAL LIFE? IS THIS REALLY HAPPENING? You should be ashamed of yourself.

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Emma S posted on

I provided them with my driver's license so that they could copy it letter for letter.

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The rest of us posted on

We stand in solidarity with you Emma. You are very brave for reporting him and dealing with the idiotic administration because you wanted to protect the next potential victims. Rest assured, it's only a matter of time before he goes to prison or gets beaten badly by a survivor. Society isn't going to tolerate criminals like him anymore. Look at who finds him despicable and it's nearly everyone: men, women, conservative, liberals, young and old. Just watch and see how he burns his own future to the ground with frankly what I think is a severe mental illness. He deserves to rot in the prison cell he will eventually call home.

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Edward White posted on

I believe you Emma. A cop who can't spell is much more likely than you lying about your name on a police report you voluntarily filed. These anonymous cowards who post this crap are vile.

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SHUT THE FUCK UP posted on

SHUT UP.

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*^ posted on

the above comment is in response to the asshole claiming she spelled her name wrong on purpose.

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Anonymous posted on

Emra Suhkowicz - Emma mispronounced her name on purpose. Lying bitch.

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Anonymous posted on

DID YOU JUST CALL A VICTIM A "BITCH"??? go to hell

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hahahahaha posted on

SOOO PATHETIC that JP/whoever he told to comment on this article are making themselves just even WORSE stfu

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current student posted on

You're an idiot. It's the police station, they require your actual identity to report a crime, and impersonation/identity theft is a felony. She would have had to give an ID or a social security number or identification.

Also, if she is voluntarily reporting the crime against her and wants him (you?) prosecuted, why would she give a false name? Stupid, stupid.

Clearly, you have reason to discredit her story here. No one is buying this dumb argument.

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Anonymous posted on

I bet your parents wish they could get a refund for you. I know if I were them I would have wished that I had used a condom on the unfortunate night you were conceived. You are an embarrassment to men everywhere.

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The Turk posted on

@ The guy above me: You can have sex with a person for n-th time and allow for any sexual act you like. Once the person withdraws consent, that's rape. So the answer to your (rhetorical) question is yes. If I continue to anally penetrate my sexual partner without her consent, even had she consented initially but later balked, that's rape. You should get your facts right.

By the way, to call the victim of a non-consensual sexual act a slut is the textbook definition of slut-shaming. Rape never is and never can be a victim's fault.

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Anonymous posted on

You're wasting your time. Rapists think their way is the norm. They think all guys rape. This rapist think he's just "keeping it real"--he's just saying what everyone else thinks. He doesn't know civilized people, including 99% of his dudebro friends, would shun him if they knew what he was so bravely saying here, over and over and over. But he's a rapist, and they deserve to be put down. Hopefully he attacks the wrong person one day who fights back and kills him. Wouldn't that be great? One less rapist to worry about.

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Anonymous posted on

We still continually only hear her side of the story in every news outlet possible. There is no story here until the young man is also interviewed and allowed to speak. Obviously when Columbia heard all the facts he was found innocent. And a university"s proof a guilt is substantially lower than that of a court of law.

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Anonymous posted on

You say "allowed to speak" as if someone is preventing him from speaking. He has declined comment to every news source that has reached out to him. He doesn't want to speak. You also assume that "Columbia heard all the facts," when during the hearing they suppressed evidence and allowed him to make up lies and describe disgusting fantasy sex scenes. Columbia suppressed the truth and plugged their ears to the facts.

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CC 15 posted on

Seconding above. Legally, media outlets are obligated to reach out to him for comment, and have been doing so. HE is the one refusing to comment--no doubt at the advice of all of his lawyers.

These are the same lawyers he hired for the cases at Columbia, and they manipulated the system to suppress critical evidence and refuse to allow important witnesses. Read the article from earlier this year: When he was actually found guilty in one case, he and his lawyers appealed after the victim had already graduated. Valentini granted him a whole NEW trial, totally outside of regular protocol. This meant that the victim couldn't even participate because she was away living her life, and that a whole new panel considered the evidence, without EVER hearing from or seeing her. Not surprising, then, that he was found not guilty. The system is fucked.

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Anonymous posted on

In that particular case, the victim who graduated also declined the option to review and comment on his statement over email and provide her own account.

It's not like she was completely shut out of the appeal - she was offered a chance to participate and chose not to.

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Anonymous posted on

An innocent man would be speaking up. If I was falsely accused by a woman, I'd be talking to every last journalist calling me. What do you want him to say? "I'm fucked up mentally and deserve chemical castration? I come from a long line of rapists?"

I'll tell you what he's saying: "I've raped at least three women and have gotten away with it thanks to the incompetence of Columbia's administration. I will continue my criminal activities until one day I get caught and thrown into prison or someone gives me a well-deserved shot to the head as a service to the community."

He can go to hell and so can the cowardly rapist-defending administration. We should be demanding that every one of them gets fired.

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legal advice posted on

not if you had a good lawyer you wouldn't!

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Anonymous posted on

I'm weary of pointing this out, but he did not rape the other two women who complained, by their own accounts. Read the Blue & White story. Anyone who claims he did has a cavalier disregard for the facts, and their opinion may be safely ignored.

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Anonymous posted on

We still continually only hear her side of the story in every news outlet possible. There is no story here until the young man is also interviewed and allowed to speak. Obviously when Columbia heard all the facts he was found innocent. And a university"s proof a guilt is substantially lower than that of a court of law.

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Anonymous posted on

"...until the young man is also interviewed and allowed to speak."

>>>Nungesser did not respond to request for comment.

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Anonymous posted on

Oh, come on, how can these men possibly speak when there is a witch hunt out to hang them.

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Nonny posted on

Yes, it must be awful to try to explain your situation to someone and be dismissed, let alone ridiculed when you only want to see justice done.

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Anonymous posted on

The only thing that is causing problems for him is his own criminal activities. You don't see the rest of us men at Columbia worrying about being part of a witch hunt because we're not busy raping people.

It benefits everyone for the campus to be rid of the small percentage of criminals. Their place is in jail not on a campus filled with potential targets for these sickos. Expel him, prosecute him through the legal system, lock him up and throw away the key. He will not be missed.

Next you're going to be telling us that Sandusky was innocent and a victim of a witchhunt because you are dumbass that has a hard time grasping reality. Grow some balls bro and stand up for what's right.

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A bro posted on

"Grow some balls bro and stand up for what's right". Well, bro, I should think what's right isn't taking a morally superior attitude and creating a false sense of solidarity with your fellow "bro's" on campus. Indeed, the "grow some balls" comment is particularly clumsy on this board. How about stopping to deliberate, considering the evidence, and recognizing that our justice system, however inept, is preferable to the judgement of the masses, especially the "grow some balls bro" masses.

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Anonymous posted on

The title is misleading and purposefully anti Columbia. She is not "frustrated by Columbia's inaction" in fact Columbia acted quickly and swiftly and took her seriously. She is angry at the outcome of the report that was not in her favor. The decision is what it is. If she wants to lower the standards of proof, then she needs to take this in a different direction.

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Anonymous posted on

Yes, Columbia acted "quickly and swiftly" if you count postponing the case for 8 months just because Mr. Nungesser had "academic conflicts" every step of the way, such as studying for midterms.

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Anonymous posted on

It is the understatement of the decade to say that if you have three different women accusing you of sexual assault, at a minimum you had better reexamine your sexual practices.
I am not sure how this makes Columbia at fault, however. There are no allegations in this story of procedural irregularities or that the victim was denied her rights to a hearing on the issue. It was simply the decision that she disagrees with. Other than adopting standard where the victim is automatically believed and the accused is automatically convicted, I am not sure how Columbia could do anything differently.

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Anonymous posted on

Did you read what the "assaults" were? " He tried to kiss me" " he touched my arm."

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Duh posted on

Did you miss the part about choking and nonconsensual sexual acts? Or are you the rapist's Grandma?

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Anonymous posted on

It is the understatement of the decade to say that if you have three different women accusing you of sexual assault, at a minimum you had better reexamine your sexual practices.
I am not sure how this makes Columbia at fault, however. There are no allegations in this story of procedural irregularities or that the victim was denied her rights to a hearing on the issue. It was simply the decision that she disagrees with. Other than adopting standard where the victim is automatically believed and the accused is automatically convicted, I am not sure how Columbia could do anything differently.

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Anonymous posted on

Columbia let a person who raped three people back on campus so yeah, I'd say they're at fault.

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Anonymous posted on

He did not rape anybody. They were "assaults." This is why this story has gotten out of hand.

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roisin posted on

he raped Emma.

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Anonymous posted on

So basically she as an adult had consensual sex for the umpteenth time with the same guy, and did not like how he did it, one time, days later, after talking to friends who also slept with him bragging and comparing notes. Hmm.

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Nonny posted on

"Umpteenth," huh? I guess if the intricacies of the word "no" are too tough for you, so are numbers higher than two.

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Well, then posted on

I guess I'll avoid ever having sex with you, OP. Seems like "no" sounds like consent to you...

Ladies and gentleman, beware: the above thinks like a rapist. Avoid at all costs.

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Anonymous posted on

Wrong. It is naive and dangerous for women to consent to 99 out of 100 things, then cry foul on the hundredth. All of these "assaults" were people who knew each other and had already slept together several times and with multiple partners. You can see how these cases are so difficult.

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Reflecting posted on

Yeah, very few people enjoy being strangled when they're having sex. Some do, but it's a small minority. Better to err on the side of caution, boys, and not strangle the person you're having sex with.
Good rule for life.

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Anonymous posted on

You forgot to your meds today, douchebag.

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Anonymous posted on

You forgot to take your meds today, douchebag.

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Anon posted on

Men, save your texts. What is to stop any woman from going to the cops after a night of sex.

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cc '15 posted on

Literally, what would anyone get out of "going to the cops"? Why would someone make this shit up, given how the police, university, internet, and whole damn world are likely to treat them? There is actually NO reason I can think of that someone would put themselves through the public and private torture of actually reporting these crimes unless they were true. Emma's account here clearly shows that they wouldn't be believed even if it actually was rape, and would be subjected to abusive and victim-blaming interrogations.

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Anonymous posted on

Women file false and exaggerated reports everyday against ex boyfriends and ex-husbands.

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Anonymous posted on

The false accusation rate for rape is less than that of burglary or other crimes. A little knowledge won't kill ya.

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Anonymous posted on

-proven false accusation rate is less. But I think we all understand proving anything when it comes to rape is fairly difficult. So that stat is nonsense.

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True - False allegations are rampant posted on

False allegations are rampant but so are LAWSUITS against them. False accusations are CRIME as is rape. They both ruin lives.

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Anonymous posted on

The benefit to women coming forward is we finally get some details upon which to make reasoned judgments, rather than just all the rhetoric we have been hearing. All the details are not in this article, but if three different women (assuming they did not coordinate their stories) all accuse one guy of sexual assault, at some point the college needs to send him packing.

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Anonymous posted on

This is a hot topic. ..hope we get it cleared up before graduation, so that we don't have to discuss anal during the ceremony.

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Anonymous posted on

And I hope you failed to graduate!

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Recent Concerned CC Alum posted on

Please, never go to the university to report a CRIME. Go to the police. Rape is a crime--not a disciplinary problem. Police handle criminal maters.

The University wants you to go to the administration so that they can cover it up.

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Anonymous posted on

Did you read her account of going to the police? Clearly the criminal justice system does not treat rape victims with respect. The university, however, should handle these cases seriously, and expel rapists. The courts are unlikely to find Jean-Paul guilty, but Columbia can and should expel him for committing this horrible crime.

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police do treat rape victims with respect posted on

but they have to ask questions. You can't just waltz in, accuse someone of rape, and think that they will take your word for it. If you're not filing false accusations, then you should be able to describe what happened to you and answer their questions. They've seen it all and they can tell immediately when someone is fabricating a story. So Columbia dismissed Emma's claim, and the police, apparently, did as well... So you think this is a conspiracy against her? Don't you have a shred of doubt?

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You don't make any sense posted on

"The courts are unlikely to find Jean-Paul guilty" but Columbia should expel him? So you know this wouldn't fly in real court but you still think his life should be ruined just to prove your cause? Just because he's a man, he must be a rapist - because you and your crazy biddies say so? You need to grow up, and start using your brain. I'm ashamed to be in the same school as you.

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Common Sense posted on

The administrators of Columbia are idiots. Who lets off a three time rapist? What is the likelihood that three separate women would separately report something horrific that "is not likely to have happened". They should fire all the administrators who have aided this criminal. It's obvious that the students there are significantly smarter than those who are being overpaid to keep them safe.

An injustice anywhere is an injustice everywhere.

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Anonymous posted on

According to the details, the two other women were not raped. One was touched on the arm, the other complained about an unwanted kiss. I'm a guy, and if we include unwanted touching as a sexual assault, I've been a victim 5 or 6 times already.

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Anonymous posted on

According to the details, the two other women were not raped. One was touched on the arm, the other complained about an unwanted kiss. I'm a guy, and if we include unwanted touching as a sexual assault, I've been a victim 5 or 6 times already.

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Anonymous posted on

Maybe should be tagged #mynypd. Was this the 26th pct?

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Anonymous posted on

Yes. It was the 26th Precinct.

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Milo posted on

I have had the misfortune of coming into contact with JP Nungesser through mutual friends/film related stuff. What I will say is if I had to make a list of the men at Columbia I would think were the most likely rapists, he would be at or near the top of the list. Through friends and acquaintances I've heard of his strange and downright creepy behavior for almost two years now.

What's more this is a person whose Facebook page (before he wisely took it down today) said he was working at the Korova Milk Bar, a location in the film A Clockwork Orange, which features a hedonistic rape scene. He had to know he was under investigation. No shame whatsoever.

I don't know Emma, but if she as well as two other women have come forward about this, not to mention what I know about JP, I'm willing to give her the benefit of the doubt. Columbia should too and expel this guy, even if the evidence isn't there for him to be convicted of anything. When there's this much smoke there must be plenty of fire.

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Anonymous posted on

Columbia would be wise to tell him not to come back in the Fall.

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Word posted on

I've also heard of him being a manipulative, creepy piece of shit to women before. i filed his name away as "creepy" before, but am now realizing that people were probably trying to process and/or warn me of significantly more dangerous behavior. I was not at all surprised to see his name show up on that bathroom wall.

From the bottom of my heart, I hope he gets kicked out of this school and rejected from everywhere else--and that somehow he can get some help and stop committing violence against others.

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Anonymous posted on

" Columbia should too and expel this guy, even if the evidence isn't there for him to be convicted of anything. When there's this much smoke there must be plenty of fire."

Shirking on due process is the exact reason this situation got so messy. I wouldn't suggest ignoring the process even further as a solution.

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Milo posted on

I have had the misfortune of coming into contact with JP Nungesser through mutual friends/film related stuff. What I will say is if I had to make a list of the men at Columbia I would think were the most likely rapists, he would be at or near the top of the list. Through friends and acquaintances I've heard of his strange and downright creepy behavior for almost two years now.

What's more this is a person whose Facebook page (before he wisely took it down today) said he was working at the Korova Milk Bar, a location in the film A Clockwork Orange, which features a hedonistic rape scene. He had to know he was under investigation. No shame whatsoever.

I don't know Emma, but if she as well as two other women have come forward about this, not to mention what I know about JP, I'm willing to give her the benefit of the doubt. Columbia should too and expel this guy, even if the evidence isn't there for him to be convicted of anything. When there's this much smoke there must be plenty of fire.

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Anonymous posted on

Great movie, incidentally.

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I like movies posted on

meh

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I like movies posted on

Throw JP Shitball out of Columbia

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Anonymous posted on

I'm pretty sure these pro-rapists comments don't come from the Columbia University community. I wouldn't be surprised if they are rapists writing in from prison. Hey, you're going to meet prisonmate Nungesser soon!

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Survivor posted on

Thank you Emma for coming forward and being strong for all of us

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Anonymous posted on

Wild funky sex - anal - then repentant the next day. The truth will set you free!!!

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Anonymous posted on

Wild funky sex - anal - then repentant the next day. The truth will set you free!!!

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Student posted on

You are a sick, disgusting human being, who clearly doesn't understand the simple definition of rape. In fact, it scares me to acknowledge that you are probably a rapist yourself, because I don't know who else would have such an intense, cruel, and horrifying reaction to this kind of story.

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Survivor posted on

What a horrific excuse for a human being you are. Even though I wish you could know our pain firsthand, I nevertheless pray that you -- and all others -- never have to go through what we've been through. The pain is unspeakable, and the trauma is never-ending. Please think twice before you post callous and insensitive remarks.

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Me posted on

This comment was deleted as per Spectator's comment policy.

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Katharine Celentano, GS posted on

Dear anonymous Spec commenter,

I know you probably think you're "just" trolling, but you're also being a jerk. So tough, original, and brave [sarcasm], leaving anonymous comments on the internet trying to make light of a heavy situation. Grow up, and act like an adult.

It's not my usual style to tell people to shut up, but the situation calls for it: shut up.

Non-anonymously, of my own accord, and indexed by Google,
Katharine

Katharine Celentano, GS
kec2156@columbia.edu

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Cody James Wright born on Nov 19th 1987 Newport News VA posted on

Hi, I was the one who commented. Not trolling at all. I was dead serious. This story was hot as hell and the fact that the ruined girl posted her picture makes jerking off to it that much more pleasurable. I don't give a fuck what people think. Yes Cody Wright is my real name.

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Nonny posted on

You can post all you like about it, but no one cares about your dick.

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YesYesYall posted on

One issue that never gets spoken about: the poor value put on substantive human relationships and how that directly contributes to this problem of rape and sexual assault. I don't want to write an essay in a comment box (nor do I have the time at this moment), but knowing the person that you are having sex with, really knowing that person beyond the casual hookups, and knowing that each person actually loves and values the other person beyond a piece of flesh, is a great way to make sure horrific things like this never happen.

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Anonymous posted on

I agree with you. In this post feminism hook up world, no one has any respect for the next human being. Anyone can be discarded and replaced at any time. All empathy is gone and materialism reigns.

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Anonymous posted on

I reported tithe police 9 months after I was raped and there is evidence beyond physical injury that can be gathered. To rely solely on physical injury is to say rape only matters if the victim is physically injured, which is to dismiss sexual violation as a crime and only treat physical assault as the only crime occurring. If a person says no to sex it doesn't matter how gently the other person violates their body it is rape.
Also when I reported to the police it was one of the most difficult things I have ever done in my life. I still felt humiliated and violated to have to speak out loud what was done to me even though the investigator was wonderful.

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Anonymous posted on

Actually it is not rape. It is assault or possible battery. People use the terms interchangeably, and there is a huge difference.

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Anonymous posted on

I'm sure you're an expert regarding this situation, anonymous stranger.

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Anonymous posted on

I am so over this story and these people. I think they all should leave Columbia. This has occupied most of our year. There are other things going on on campus and the world too.

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Jaranar posted on

Rapists need to be castrated.

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Anonymous posted on

And if they do it a second time, killed.

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Anonymous posted on

That's why we have a justice system in the country and not crazy people like you.

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Anonymous posted on

Keep putting that graffiti back up!

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Good luck Emma or 'Emra' posted on

This is probably an incredibly stressful and draining time for you but please know that you are admired and respected by so many people for not giving up on this. Thanks for standing up to Columbia, NYPD and most of all to Jean-Paul Nungesser, the monster that raped you. They want you silenced so thanks for working so hard to make sure that doesn't happen.

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Anonymous posted on

Emma Sulkowicz | Emra Suhkowicz - lies get you only so far in life....

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Anonymous posted on

Rape is wrong. Non consent is wrong. Beyond reasonable doubt is the law. Amazing how innocent status is trashed in the fury to condemn. This is Columbia?

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Anonymous posted on

The libel and/or slander suits are sure to follow in fall or later. Once a civil court finds for the plaintiff, the whole situation now moves to the absurd. If the victim will not or cannot file a complaint with law enforcement, the schools will quickly stop playing an active role here. Once the school loses a civil case, taking the alleged crime to an non-judicial entity will stop, maybe very fast.
Schools are not for criminal cases, criminal courts are.
This is a very slippery slope

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Ferrah posted on

I wonder how many obscene comments about female students have been left up on Columbia bathroom walls over the years. Bet you the administration never did anything about those.

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Anonymous posted on

You haven't been in a male bathroom ever, have you?

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Anonymous posted on

I wish you well, my brother, in fighting these witches. In time, they will melt. Be patient, be strong.

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Anonymous posted on

I've been thinking on this case, and my thoughts are:

1. I tend to believe Emma Sulkowicz, because I doubt she would have come out the way she did, facing the consequences, if she weren't telling the truth. I understand she must have been distraught and confused at first, but time helped her clarify in her mind what had really happened and what she had to do for the sake of protecting of other women. I fully sympathize with her.

2. Jean-Paul Nungesser apparently subscribes to common belief among many men, that once a woman has consented to go to bed with them, they can do anything they want. Indeed, once the victim has consented, where can the limits be established? Granted. When she says stop. However, many men would believe the victim will be "grateful" once they get done. Furthermore, even if she isn't, since she had already consented at the beginning, who will believe her?

3. This poses a very difficult case for the authorities, both at the University and at NYPD, since they are also in a position in which they don't have the necessary legal elements to charge the accused. In this particular case, the "social networks" is the instrument of punishment, since Nungesser's reputation is already tarnished, regardless of the legal outcome.

4. While the victim never asks for violent behavior from the rapist, cases like this could be prevented if she hadn't put herself in the wrong situation in the first place. Demanding respect from male friends is most important from the very beginning. It may be late for Emma Sulkowicz now, but other girls should think before they engage in a relationship with someone unknown. This is touchy, and I know I'll be scorned for this comment, but it's nevertheless true.

I don't doubt the case will be used by "Law and Order SVU", they've already aired an episode based on the Amherst College case.

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Anonymous posted on

1. I tend to think Emma is insane (as per Einstein: insanity is doing the same thing over again, expecting different results

2. That is your sexist assumption. You do not know him, do you?

3. Nungesser will be fine. Emma tarnished her own name. The NYPD has extensive legal remedies.

4. You are prejudging. And you are wrong. Demanding women respect men is equally important (and rare)

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Anonymous posted on

You clearly confirm why it's so important that girls like Emma come forward and tell their stories. Both boys and girls should be careful not to get into situations like this one, for their own sake.

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Nope posted on

He or she IS RIGHT!

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hear hear posted on

hear hear!

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Graduate of BC Class of 2000 posted on

I am disheartened to see that the University still doesn't take sexual assaults seriously. I graduated in 2000 and it was common knowledge that rapists were left on campus, particularly those who were athletes. I am happy to hear that Emma and other women are more pro-active than we were then. Perhaps, if we took the steps you did today, we could have saved some of you from this violence. Keep fighting the good fight.

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I think posted on

you're an idiot. Graduated in 2000 and still not using your own head. Pathetic!

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Anonymous posted on

Here's the problem Emma. In order for you to get someone accused of rape to be actually found guilty, you need proof. And you have none.

So basically you are libeling your way into a lawsuit. Have fun with that.

And to all of you who are going to respond and tell me how I'm part of rape culture or some other BS, just stop. I'm telling how it is. You can't just go to the police 1.5 years after a rape happened (I'm sorry, alleged rape) and expect that you're going to get the results you want.

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Anonymous posted on

Agree. She should have gone to the police immediatly. Rape is a crime.

At this point she should not be doing this.

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Chris Fung posted on

If I were to claim that Emma Sulkowicz rape me, would that mean we should send the witch hunt after her? Is that how this works?

Would the Spectator run an article calling her a rapist?

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Anonymous posted on

Men

Join: avoiceformen.com

Smash feminism. Smash the Matriarchy. Take back the day!

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Anonymous posted on

I have absolutely no connection with Columbia University, but I just wanted to send a heartfelt shout-out to Emma Sulkowicz. I believe her.

What Miss Sulkowicz is doing is so incredibly brave and courageous. She has been through more torment than I can possibly conceive, and I sincerely hope she is getting the help she needs. I urge all her classmates to surround her with nothing but love and support. It's heartbreaking that victim blaming is so rampant in cases of sexual assault. It doesn't matter what the victim is wearing or how much the victim drank; it doesn't matter what the victim's gender, race, ethnicity, religion, or sexual orientation is. It is NEVER the fault of the victim.

This country needs to address the sexual assault crisis on our campuses. Thank you Miss Emma Sulkowicz for helping pave the way.

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Anonymous posted on

Here is a SHOUT OUT to thank the women of Columbia University for what they are doing.

They are doing more to turn off good men and women from feminism than any men's rights group ever did.

Dang, what has happened to my alma mater: it has degenerated into fragile feme fetales who fear the sight of a penis, and think all men are evil. Dang, you women are sick and demented.

Why don't you make a lesbian porn movie in Butler? (Oh, you already did that?)

Too bad, Emma: a life destined for solitude due to your own exaggerations. YOur brought it on yourself.

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False accusations are a form of abuse as well posted on

There are way too many false accusations for anyone to take any claim as the final truth and without proper investigation. Do you know what has just happened at Vassar? Drew? other colleges.... girls filed complaints with colleges, described in detail how they were raped, guys they were involved with were immediately kicked out. Witnesses and no evidence that the guys were innocent were allowed. The guys were called rapists, spat on, kicked off campus, while the girls were surrounded by their "support group" that tried to eliminate any 'post trauma triggers".... it turned out that the girls were lying. Read the articles below. Now I don't know Emma's case inside out, and only she and the guy she was with know what really happened. It's up to the police to investigate. Rape is a serious offense, and should be dealt with in court but so should false accusations. They both leave serious trauma in people's lives.
http://www.mindingthecampus.com/originals/2014/05/here_come_the_lawsuits_over_se.html

http://www.mindingthecampus.com/originals/2014/05/more_on_vassars_rigged_sex_hea.html

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nancy smith posted on

while it is regrettable this had to become 'open', it is far more to be commended that this singular and individual person went through the 'glass ceiling' of the self serving institutional barriers to real justice. what remains now may be the usual money focused, legal snarls provided by the existing dark ages of institutional legacy, a legacy clearly unwilling to face the truths of violence and abuse that remains hidden and concealed by those very legacy protections.

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Anonymous posted on

Play today. Call it rape tomorrow? The sultry look. My opinion: she looks like a porn star.

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Anonymous posted on

Just to make sure I got it right... So you and a willing partner are having consensual vaginal sex with all the moans , the pawing of each others bodies, when one partner is saying dont stop or stop , hard to tell since you both been humping a good 10 minutes already, so legs and position are moved and then all activity stops. At which point did it become rape? Is there a number of seconds or number of humps being counted since the initial request to stop before it becomes rape? Should one moan of 'stop' in a room with loud progressive jazz mood music set playing be enough to guarantee that after 10 minutes it may not have been even heard? Please help... Last thing I want is to fuck anyone who just wanted a screw.

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Anonymous posted on

Babe - If we hook up / have sex - will you wait 1 year, then call it rape?

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Anonymous posted on

Babe - If we hook up / have sex - will you wait 1 year, then call it rape?

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Change is needed posted on

An absurd definition of sexual assault
"Consider Columbia's extraordinarily broad definition of "sexual assault," which goes far beyond anything in the criminal justice system, in two respects.
First, the university defines sexual assault as not only rape, as understood in the criminal justice system, but also "any intentional sexual touching, however slight, with any object without a person's consent. Intentional sexual contact includes contact with the breasts, buttocks, groin, or touching another with any of these body parts, or making another person touch any of these body parts; any intentional bodily contact in a sexual manner." How many people would consider such behavior--while indefensible--to constitute rape? To Columbia, however, forcible sexual penetration and nonconsensual "sexual touching, however slight" are both "sexual assault." And the fliers suggest that the message has been received.
Second, while the university notes that sexual assault, by definition, comes without consent, it modifies this provision in a critical way: "Alcohol and other drugs can lower inhibitions and create an atmosphere of confusion over whether consent is freely and affirmatively given." Taken literally, then, any alcohol use by the female party to sexual intercourse could call into question whether a Columbia tribunal will subsequently brand a male student a rapist, since even if the female gave consent, the university claim non-consensual contact on grounds of "confusion over whether consent is freely and affirmatively given."
In this atmosphere, accused students appear to be guilty until proven innocent, even as Title IX claims suggesting that the definitions above (coupled with procedures that deny accused students the right to counsel) unlawfully act against the rights of accusers.
As colleges adopt a de facto presumption of guilt in undertaking investigations for which they are in no way competent, they will be hit with more and more of these kinds of lawsuits. And it's fair to say that the presidents and administrators of these institutions are bringing it on themselves." K.C. Johnson
- See more at: http://www.mindingthecampus.com/originals/2014/05/here_come_the_lawsuits_over_se.html#sthash.B7ehPNXk.HEx9TmQX.dpu

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CC alum posted on

Some of the comments on here make me sick. I am ashamed and disgusted to go to school with some of you people. No one gives a flying fuck whether you "believe her" or not, and you sure as hell have no right to make sick jokes about her "deserving it". I am so fucking happy I am not American. I swear to God I have never been in a country where this kind of bullshit is tolerated to this extent. Have you no empathy? Can you not imagine the strength it takes for someone to come forward like this and, in so doing, open themselves up to the woman-hating vitriol you seem so comfortable to spew? This country has a HUGE fucking entitlement problem. If you think you have a right to sex with a woman regardless of whether she says NO or not, then I hope you burn in hell.

And yes, I know it's "not all Americans". But I have never come across such ignorance and hate anywhere else in the world. So I apologise to all the wonderful Americans who managed to escape growing up with the idea that they have a right to whatever the fuck they want -- kudos for being human.

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even though posted on

some of the comments seem too crude for your sensibility, those people make a point, though. I believe they would emphasize with real victims of sexual violence or at least those who report the violence immediately and not wait 2 years to accuse someone of something that is hard to prove. That said, the point is - just because someone accuses someone of rape does not mean that the accusation is true. That has been proven over and over again. What is needed is PROOF - otherwise, if you yourself are accused of something you didn't do - should we immediately believe the accuser. Now, don't get me wrong - I think that any violence is despicable but so are false accusations, so that's why we should be very careful with what we're assuming.

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I agree posted on

Yes, the language can be crude and offensive but it doesn't mean that people who are using that kind of language condone sexual assault and rape. Filing charges after 2 years..... well, you can expect that questioning will be thorough and tough. Otherwise everyone could be ruined based on someone's word alone. Sorry, but justice doesn't work that way! It this country, anyway. This is pure witch hunt and most of you are acting irrationally.

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I don't know posted on

"This country has a HUGE fucking entitlement problem. If you think you have a right to sex with a woman regardless of whether she says NO or not, then I hope you burn in hell."

Well, most of us don't believe in heaven and hell. I don't know what country you're coming from, but you should check statistics there, first. Why are you here if it's that bad? To get a good education, I bet, so you can go back to your country and brag!

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