News | Student Life

Estakio Beltran, SIPA ’14, running for Congress

  • COLUMBIA'S CONGRESSMAN? | Estakio Beltran, SIPA ’14, is running for Washington state's 4th Congressional district, with a campaign focused on expanding child welfare benefits and job creation.

Estakio Beltran will graduate from the School of International and Public Affairs this spring, and his next stop may be Congress—if the votes are in his favor. 

Beltran, SIPA ’14, announced his candidacy as a Democrat last week for Washington’s 4th Congressional District. If elected, Beltran says he hopes to advocate for the middle class through creating jobs and increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of Congress.

According to Beltran, his campaign centers on “those Americans who are hardworking and could just do so much more if we gave them a hand up instead of a hand down.”

Beltran grew up shuttling between foster families in Yakima Valley, Washington’s wine country and the area he hopes to represent. 

“For me, I really had to, growing up, depend on help from the community around me,” Beltran said. “It’s a community that really gave a lot to me.”

“The area I’m looking to represent—we’re a more practical, common-sense people, and I think they deserve a representative that shares those values,” Beltran said.  

After graduating from high school, Beltran went on to Gonzaga University, where he worked on child welfare issues as a representative of the Orphan Foundation of America. Beltran then took his advocacy experience to Capitol Hill, first as an assistant, then for Washington Senator Maria Cantwell, and then as a senior policy adviser for California Congressman Dennis Cardoza.

Working with Cardoza gave Beltran ample opportunity to further his experience with child welfare policy. 

“It was great because all of a sudden, I had a job and a boss who cared about these ideas as much as I did, and it really gave me the opportunity to make a dent in child welfare policy, and it was incredible,” he said.

After working in Cardoza’s office for five years, Beltran went on to pursue a masters degree at SIPA.

“I’ve gotten so much from my professors at SIPA, from the campus here, and just being in New York,” Beltran said. “You don’t sleep much, but when there’s so much at stake, I find that I’m more driven.”

University Provost John Coatsworth taught Beltran in a SIPA seminar about U.S.-Latin American relations since World War II. Coatsworth told Spectator that he feels SIPA students are particularly well-positioned to be in Congress.

“Estakio’s uniquely difficult personal journey seems to have prepared him to understand the challenges faced by many of his future constituents,” Coatsworth said. 

“We devoted a good deal of time to complicated issues like drug trafficking policies. I’m delighted to know that these discussions helped him on his way,” Coatsworth said.  

Petr Cibulka, Jr., SIPA ’14, is helping Beltran with his campaign strategy.

Cibulka said that although his time at SIPA was a formative period in Beltran’s life, the values that make him a good politician were there before he came to Columbia.  

“The reason why he’s qualified is because when we first met, it was obvious that he had the drive to make things happen—he was always involved with political stuff,” Cibulka said. “The school is there to facilitate and to help you accomplish your goals and ambitions, but it all starts with you personally.”

maia.bix@columbiaspectator.com  |  @MaiaClay4

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Anonymous posted on

Nice - I'll vote for you if you vote for us!
POPULIST AGENDA:
Democrats’ Populist Agenda Will Win Because It Is What The Public Wants http://ourfuture.org/20140401/dems-populist-agenda-will-win-because-it-is-what-the-public-wants?utm_source=pmupdate&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20140401
RAISE THE MINIMUN WAGE: 69 percent favor raising the minimum wage to $10.10 over the next three years. 58 percent are more likely to vote for a candidate that supports raising the federal minimum wage.
PROVIDE PAY EQUALITY FOR WOMAN: 90 percent want to achieve pay equity by raising pay for women (74 percent strongly support it). And among unmarried women, 95 percent favor raising pay for women, 85 percent strongly.
DEFEND MEDICARE: 69 percent are less likely to vote for a candidate that supports reductions in Social Security and Medicare benefits to address the budget deficit. 69 percent believe the benefits from Medicare are worth the cost of the program for taxpayers.
MAKE CHILD CARE AFFORDABLE: 86 percent support helping low-wage workers afford quality child care.
MAKE COLLEGE AFFORDABLE: 84 percent support expanding publicly funded scholarships to help more families afford college. 77 percent believe that over the past few years it has become harder to pay for college.
A JOBS STRATEGY THAT IS FOCUSED ON MANUFACTURING AND INFRASTRUCTURE: 77 percent favor hiring people to do urgent infrastructure repairs. 71 percent support increasing government investment to build and repair roads, bridges, high-speed rail, smart electric grid technology and other infrastructure needs. 77 percent support tax incentives for manufacturer investments.
PAYING FOR THIS BY CLOSING TAX LOOPHOLES FOR THE RICH AND CORPORATIONS: Nine out of 10 believe that any revenue generated by closing corporate loopholes or limiting tax deductions for the wealthy should be used for public investment and deficit reduction (82 percent), not to lower tax rates on corporations or the wealthy (9 percent).

POPULIST AGENDA:
11 Ways The Ryan Budget Goes Against What Public Wants http://ourfuture.org/20140402/11-ways-the-ryanrepublican-budget-goes-against-what-public-wants?utm_source=pmupdate&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20140402
JOB CREATION: 74 percent say improving the job situation is a key issue facing the president and Congress this year. The Obama budget includes $143 billion for job creation initiatives. The CPC includes $1.3 trillion for job creation. There’s nothing in the Ryan/Republican budget.
MEDICAID: 74 percent have a favorable view Medicaid expansion under Obamacare. The Obama budget maintains that. The CPC budget increases funding for Medicaid through supplemental grants to states. The Republican budget makes deep cuts to Medicaid, converts the program to a block grant administered at the state level, and repeals the Medicaid expansion.
FOOD STAMPS (SNAP) – 70 percent oppose cuts to SNAP. The Obama budget proposes no changes. The CPC budget restores SNAP benefits to pre-Farm Bill levels, investing $15 billion. The Republican budget makes deep cuts.
EDUCATION– 69 percent say improving the education system in the U.S. is a top priority for the president and Congress this year. The Obama provides $66 billion to fund Preschool for All Initiative. The CPC provides $47 billion to invest in teachers and K-12 schools, in addition to adding substantially to the general discretionary funding for education. The Republican budget freezes the maximum Pell grant award at the same level for the next 10 years, provides financial aid to fewer families, and makes substantial cuts to overall discretionary spending, which includes education.
TAX LOOPHOLES - 67 percent want a budget that closes corporate tax loopholes and limits tax breaks for the wealthy. The Obama budget raises $651 billion by doing this, and $13.8 billion by closing others. The CPC budget raises $153 billion by cutting loopholes and deductions for the wealthy, raises $14 billion by eliminating the home mortgage-interest deduction for vacation homes and yachts. The Republican budget says it will close loopholes, but does not specify any.
CORPORATE TAXES 66 percent think corporations pay too little in taxes. 79 percent want to close tax loopholes that make sure corporations pay as much on foreign profits as they do on domestic profits. Obama raises $150 billion by closing offshore loopholes, another $48 billion by cutting oil company loopholes. The CPC closes loopholes and implements a Wall Street tax to raise $908 billion. The Republican budget dramatically cuts corporate taxes. It reduces the top corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 25 percent and reduces or eliminates all taxes on overseas corporate profits.
INDIVIDUAL TAXES: – 61 percent say upper-income earners don’t pay enough in taxes. Obama proposes a minimum tax rate on millionaires to raise $53 billion. The CPC budget raises taxes on the wealthy by $1.27 trillion. The Republican budget dramatically cuts taxes on the wealthy. It reduces top tax rates by replacing the current tax brackets with just two brackets of 10 percent and 25 percent.
SOCIAL SECURITY -66 percent say making the Social Security system sound is a key issue facing the president and Congress this year. Obama and the Republicans would prevent people from collecting Social Security Disability Insurance and UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE BENEFITS at the same time. CPC proposes changes such as eliminating the cap on earnings subject to Social Security tax.
MEDICARE: – 61 percent say making the Medicare system sound is a key issue facing the president and Congress this year. Obama raises premiums on wealthy retirees, and reduces Medicare Advantage payments to private insurers, among other changes, to save $354 billion. CPC negotiates for lower prescription drug prices to save $157 billion. The Republican budget changes Medicare in 2024 with a voucher system for private insurance and raises the age of eligibility.
MILITARY FUNDING: – 58 percent would support substantial reductions in military spending. Obama increases it 5 percent in the first year. CPC cuts military spending by $255 billion. Republicans increase military spending $483 billion.
EDUCATION, ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT, HOUSING, JOB TRAINING, ETC (“DISCRETIONARY SPENDING”) – Opinion polls suggest that domestic investment in education, energy and environment, job training, and other areas are top priorities for Americans. Other polls show Americans would rather see higher tax revenue than cuts to these areas. Obama provides an extra $162 billion above sequester levels over 10 years. CPC provides an extra $1.56 trillion above sequester levels over 10 years. Republicans cut domestic programs substantially – nearing 20 percent in some cases – for total cuts of $791 billion over a decade.

We'll stand and support you if you will stand and support us.

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Anonymous posted on

I'm from Pasco, Washington. You have my vote if you'll support doing something about the massive income inequality, cutting the defense budget significantly, push for immigration reform, support raising the minimum wage to a living wage, and most importantly do something about the Citizens United ruling which ruins our Democracy.

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Anonymous posted on

Estakio is a very manipulative person, he has tried to force his way into our family through my mothers bleeding heart. Also I have spoken to a girl who was in the care of my parents at the same time and she told me stories of Estakio making her uncomfortable through threats in a home that was suppose to be a safe place for her. He also has no real work experience outside of government. How can someone who has no real world work experience represent the people?

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Joy Hummer posted on

Hi,

Need print materials to distribute in Moses Lake. Please send before July 10.

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Joy Hummer posted on

Hi,

Need print materials to distribute in Moses Lake. Please send before July 10.

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Anonymous posted on

His campaign is to shoot people that do not share his opinions? Fuck Him....I saw the commercial...hey Hugo, very disrespectful and should never be allowed around guns and children. He's your Sandy Hook candidate!

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