News | Student Life

Uncontested ESC executive board party looks to expand students’ resources

  • Kiera Wood / Senior Staff Photographer
    OUT OF THE BLUE | Uncontested Engineering Student Council executive board party president Brian Wu, SEAS ’15.
  • Kiera Wood / Senior Staff Photographer
    Policy INTERESTS | Malini Nabiar, SEAS ’15, is running for Out of the Blue's VP of Policy position.
  • Kiera Wood / Senior Staff Photographer
    MONEY MATTERS | Robert Ying, SEAS ’16, is running for ESC's VP of Finance position.
  • Kiera Wood / Senior Staff Photographer
    CONNECT THE DOTS | Joshua Boggs, SEAS ’15, is running for ESC executive board's VP of Communications position.
  • Kiera Wood / Senior Staff Photographer
    LIVELIHOOD | Caroline Park, SEAS ’16, is running for ESC executive board's VP of Student Life position.

The uncontested party for the Engineering Student Council executive board, Out of the Blue, wants to provide a wider range of resources to engineering students. 

Out of the Blue is made up of presidential candidate Brian Wu, SEAS ’15, VP of Finance candidate Robert Ying, SEAS ’16, VP of Policy candidate Malini Nambiar, SEAS ’15, VP of Student Life candidate Caroline Park, SEAS ’16, and VP of Communications candidate Joshua Boggs, SEAS ’15 and a member of Spectator’s editorial board.

The party aims to improve connections with alumni, better inform students about the spaces available to them, increase project grant opportunities, and change the council’s website to better guide students through the Columbia bureaucracy.

Boggs said that he wants the ESC website to become more of a regular resource to students. He said the website could provide regular updates for events as well as pages informing groups about how to apply for funding and which administrator to contact for a specific request.

“It’s really about getting people to have a single place where they can look for information about things going on in the engineering school,” Boggs said.

Ying wants to find a way to better inform engineering students about which classrooms are left open during the night as study spaces, especially as upcoming renovations to the Seeley W. Mudd Building will remove study spaces in the Engineering Library.

“And so the goal is really to open up these spaces and let people know about them, so that if they have an idea—and it can be something like 3 a.m. in the morning—‘I’m going to walk over to Mudd or I’m going to walk over to NoCo and I’m going to build it,’” Ying said.

Wu wants to create opportunities for students and student groups to interact with alumni.

“The alumni want to learn about student groups—they want to support them,” he said. “I think that would be a great way for alumni to develop organic relationships with students.”

Nambiar said that she wants to expand the Green Labs Initiative—a move to reduce engineering labs’ energy use, recently passed by ESC—beyond the pilot labs and establish a set of University-wide efficiency standards.

“We’re hoping this will provide some really useful information on how behavioral changes can be implemented in a larger sense and how those can be rolled out,” she said.

Park hopes that Out of the Blue can use their position to better connect students to administrators. 

“We are the gap between students and administration, and we want to make that gap as small as possible,” she said.

Emma Bogler contributed reporting.

elizabeth.sedran@columbiaspectator.com  |  @ezactron

Plain text

  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Your username will not be displayed if checked
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.