News | Morningside Heights

Straphangers welcome plan for faster M60 service

  • GETTING FASTER | The MTA plans to give the M60 route dedicated bus lanes, fewer stops, off-board fare payment for quicker boarding times, and stoplight timing that would prioritize the buses.

Riders of the notoriously slow M60 bus route will find their trips a little bit faster next year, whether they’re headed to LaGuardia Airport or into West Harlem. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority plans to implement Select Bus Service on the route, which includes dedicated bus lanes, fewer stops, off-board fare payment for quicker boarding times, and stoplight timing that would prioritize the buses. M60 buses, which at times move at 2.7 miles per hour down the highly congested 125th Street, would be 12 percent faster after the upgrade, saving “at least five minutes per trip across town, and more to the airport,” according to an MTA statement. While bus ridership has fallen citywide, the M60 has been an exception to the rule, with ridership increasing by 5.5 percent between April 2011 and April 2012, according to the latest available data. Select Bus Service is only the latest upgrade for the M60 route, which is also getting larger buses between now and January. In addition, the city’s Department of Transportation plans to renovate curbs to increase pedestrian safety along the route. Straphangers on the M60 said that they welcome the changes. Suzanne Mir, 64, was on her way home from the local green market on Sunday. “These changes need to happen yesterday,” said Mir, who rides the M60 daily. “Years ago when I waited for the bus, it seemed like they came every few minutes. Now, it isn’t inconceivable for the bus to come every 20 minutes, 25 minutes, 30 minutes.” “I live on 125th Street, so I could walk from here ... but I’m not lugging these apples,” she added. School of International and Public Affairs student Stefana Bosse said that many buses in London, her hometown, have similar features to those of the new Select Bus Service. “The bus lanes help the traffic flow in other parts, but it also frustrates a lot of the drivers because it takes up so much space,” Bosse said. Still, she added, many Londoners don’t know that they have to buy a ticket before boarding the bus, which “creates a lot of confusion and stress.” “The London bus system is a mess as well,” she said. “They’re both messes.” news@columbiaspectator.com

Comments

Plain text

  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Your username will not be displayed if checked
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
Anonymous posted on

Spectator. Where is the news if Columbia alum Alvin Roth class of 1961 in operations research winning the Nobel prize in economics?

+1
-4
-1
Anonymous posted on

Yeah where is this headline?

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

Literally every student publication from Stanford, Princeton, Harvard have published on this except guess whoo Columbia

+1
+1
-1
Anonymous posted on

Guys calm down. I'm sure spec will get to it

+1
0
-1
anon posted on

You guys have to start printing all the good that happens around Columbia, not only just the bad or controversial.

+1
0
-1
Anonymous posted on

Let's see. Monday's issue featured stories about bus riders pleased with the MTA's planned changes, the councils'/administration's well-received plan to keep John Jay open late, and the release of two hawks back into the wild. Friday had stories about Nightline's reopening and the city's first nighttime farmers market. Thursday: a Columbia alum wins a Nobel prize; the community board overwhelming supports a plan to revive a local theater. By the time your comment was posted, Spec had written about the Nobel in Economics. The list goes on.

+1
-3
-1
Anonymous posted on

What "bad" or "controversial" things are you talking about, anon?

In your bipolar view of the world, Columbia good, people who criticize Columbia bad. CU never did anything wrong. There's nothing shabby or morally bankrupt about using eminent domain to take what you want when you want it.

According to you, Columbia is responsible for everything wonderful that happens within a 3-mile radius of the campus. The community had to choose between a broken-down collection of buildings and Columbia's new facilities for deadly disease research (including live pathogens).

I'm surprised that any neighborhood, like West Chelsea, Hell's Kitchen, Tribeca, Park Slope, or Williamsburg, could grow and thrive without CU's tender ministrations. They must have all just gotten lucky.

I'm sure you can't answer this question (in spite of the fact that you brought it up), but again, what bad things are you talking about?

+1
+2
-1