More in This Issue

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Faced with the task of organizing Columbia’s extensive book holdings, architects, librarians, and students of the University over the last century have battled with the impossibility of organizing the infinite. How, they wondered—and still do—do we create an ordered space that can at once curate and organize knowledge while accommodating the millions of books in Columbia’s collections?

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Despite a lack of awareness from many students, the Oral History Library in Butler contains invaluable information and allows its subjects to speak in their own words. Two oral history specialists reflect on how important this unique interpretation of historical records is.

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A Columbia University student’s mundane job in the Butler Stacks is often punctuated with perplexing discoveries, ranging from regular graffiti to the weird and wacky.

 
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“It’s like 18th century meets 21st, with no classroom in between.”

That’s how Anne Higonnet, a professor of art history at Barnard, describes her Virtual Enlightenment course in which students view 3D representations of 18th century objects on a website they design themselves.

The premise of the course, Higonnet explains, is to have students study 18th century French rooms at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and to compare those true objects with 3D models of the objects in those rooms.

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Former fashion model and Columbia College graduate Otilia Aionesei discusses misperceptions of the fashion world, her new job in a tech start-up, and her life philosophy.

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Employees at Apple Tree Market racially profiled and patted down a Columbia student of color last January. The owner of Apple Tree Market recounts the remorse and growth from interactions with the student in the three months since “Bad Apples: The Fruits of Racism At Apple Tree Supermarket.”