News | Administration

B-School dean Hubbard to advise Romney campaign

Business School Dean R. Glenn Hubbard has been appointed to lead presidential hopeful Mitt Romney’s Economic Policy Team, along with other noted economists and lobbyists.

According to a press release from the Romney campaign, the Economic Policy Team will help the Republican candidate “formulate pro-growth policies that will turn around the economy and create jobs.”

Romney released a plan for job growth in North Las Vegas, Nev. on Tuesday. Hubbard authored the foreward to the 160-page plan, Romney’s first official policy statement since he announced his bid for president in June.

“In the first conversation I had with Governor Mitt Romney in the post-crisis period, he asked me why policymakers were not more focused on the seeds of the crisis and on the need to build a foundation for long-term growth,” Hubbard wrote in the foreward to “Believe in America,” Romney’s plan for job growth. “ With the mantras of fiscal stimulus and easy money being repeated in Washington, his question seemed spot-on to me. Could we change the conversation from policies contributing to the long-term growth of government to policies contributing to the long-term growth of the economy?”

The plan calls for lowering the corporate tax rate and eliminating taxes on interest, capital gains, and dividends.

Calls to Hubbard’s office were not immediately returned and his personal publicist said that Hubbard was not available to comment.

Chuck Roberts, CC ’12 and a finance intern for the Romney campaign, said Hubbard has been speaking to the governor as an economic advisor for over a year.

“As a Columbia student and as a Romney supporter, I’m glad that he has someone as well respected in academia and in the private sector as Dean Hubbard on his economic team. It speaks well of Governor Romney as a candidate and our university.”

A statement from the Columbia University College Republicans expressed optimism over Hubbard’s involvement with the campaign.

“We applaud the appointment of Dean Glenn Hubbard as an economic adviser to the Mitt Romney presidential campaign as a strong sign that conservative thought is still respected and vital in the Columbia University community and in hopes that together, Mr. Romney and Dean Hubbard can restore America’s economic prosperity,” the statement read.

Sarah Gitlin, CC ‘12 and media director for the Columbia University College Democrats, said the group supports political engagement among academics.

“We think it’s great for educators to be involved in the political process,” she said, on behalf of the Dems. “While we obviously disagree with his opinions we value having real-life political actors at Columbia.”

Harvard economist Greg Mankiw, former Senator Jim Talent, and former congressman-turned lobbyist Vin Weber have also agreed to advise Romney’s campaign. Hubbard and Mankiw both served as chairman for the Council of Economic Advisers under George W. Bush.

Gitlin said that Romney’s choice evidences a sense of fiscal stasis in the Republican party.

“I don’t think it’s surprising to see that the Republicans running for president in 2012 are not all that different from the Republicans who got us into this mess,” she said.

leah.greenbaum@columbiaspectator.com

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Anonymous posted on

Why get an "Inside Job"-tainted one when he could have gotten a fresh one out of the free-marketeer / club for growth barrel?  These guys are still a dime a dozen and probably will be unless tax revenue falls to 13% of GDP and Norquist gets his bathtub wish.  What reality do you have to be tapping into to think the main drag of this recession is corporate and investment taxes?  Historically, how are those costs/tax revenues these days?  How are corporate profits?  What are the lessons of other recessions?  You can't get a coherent argument out of the supply siders on these issues.  And it sticks around!  http://www.slate.com/id/1910/

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