Campus

AEPi, Pike, PsiU receive interim suspensions

Student Affairs has just released a statement announcing interim suspensions for the Alpha Epsilon Pi, Pi Kappa Alpha, and Psi Upsilon fraternities on Columbia's campus stemming from the NYPD's recent arrests of several members allegedly involved in illegal drug activity in their 114th street brownstones. Recruitment, initiation, and social events must all cease immediately as part of this suspension, and the national chapters for each fraternity have been notified. Full email from Dean Kevin Shollenberger after the jump.

“The Division of Student Affairs has issued an interim suspension of the Iota Chapter of the Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity, the Iota Lambda Chapter of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, and the Lambda Chapter of the Psi Upsilon fraternity. The suspension of these organizations is the result of the NYPD’s arrests of several fraternity members who are alleged to have taken part in illegal drug activity within Columbia’s fraternity houses on West 114th Street.

According to Columbia’s Fraternity and Sorority Life Community Standards and Greek Judicial Board Handbook, a fraternity or sorority can be suspended if determined “necessary to promote the best interest” of the chapter and the University. Given the severity of the alleged behavior, we believe these interim suspensions are in the best interest of our community at this time. The three named chapters have been instructed to cease all activities, including and not limited to recruitment, initiation, and social events pending further review. We have notified the chapters’ national organizations about the suspensions.

The Division of Student Affairs will initiate an internal review of the three fraternity chapters and the Intercultural House (ICH), where the alleged behavior also took place. We plan to work closely with student leaders, the fraternity and sorority community (including national organizations), and the ICH to assess the scope of the problem and what reforms may be necessary to address these issues. We envision the involvement of students, administrators, and other members of our campus community in these conversations. Terry Martinez, Dean of Community Development and Multicultural Affairs, will oversee this review.

We remain most concerned about the health and welfare of our students and will utilize this review process as an opportunity to further educate students about their decisions and how they impact our community. In the meantime, information about Columbia’s drug and alcohol policies may be found in Essential Policies for the Columbia Community. Student advisers and Health Services remain resources for students seeking more information or support.

As part of our review, we are also committed to exploring the role of fraternity and sorority life and special interest communities on campus. We look forward to working with students to ensure all recognized organizations provide students with an enriching experience that benefits the University community.

We recognize there will be a number of questions regarding the anticipated duration of the suspension, the review process, potential outcomes, and numerous other factors. While we are not yet in a position to answer these questions, please know we are committed to conducting a timely and thorough review.”

Kevin G. Shollenberger
Associate Vice President for Undergraduate Student Life, Arts and Sciences
Dean of Student Affairs
Columbia College and The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science

Comments

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Do research before you make yourself posted on

...look ignorant.

Cocaine is primarily used in club bathrooms? See the problem is you only know what you know from watching movies.

Scroll up and read the other comments regarding the comparison between alcohol and cocaine.

To calculate the deleterious effects of a substance you must calculate a rate or a percentage. The number of people who consume alcohol is around 40 times the number of people who use cocaine. You can't compare the two unless you calculate a rate. Cocaine is not less likely to kill once you use your brain and lets experts decide which is more unhealthy. Don't open write B.S. - go do your research.

Drug laws are not arbitrary. Cocaine is deadly so the penalty for posession of cocaine compared to marijuana is very different. Posession of a small amount of pot is actually not even a crime in New York city. It's a a violation.

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Imposter posted on

Okay "Lucien", you are a freak and imposter. Look up Lucien Carr. He died in 2005. Nice touch with the Riverside Park, ("Killing in Riverside Park"). Google it and quit messing with people, freak!

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Strange posted on

What a strange question to ask.

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HEYUGOESIMSOHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII posted on

No, I am not.

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For real? posted on

How high are you at this very moment.

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For real? posted on

How high are you at this very moment

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For real? posted on

And how many people drink alcohol?
And what would happen if less than 10% of the adult population used alcohol? Deaths would plummet, correct?

Now, where in the f did you get your numbers on annual fatalities from alcohol?

About 35% of the dui deaths can be attributed to alcohol. Alcohol also causes acute alcohol toxicity and chronic alcohol consumption can cause cancers, heart disease, and liver disease.
However, small amounts of alcohol can lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Imagine how many people would OD if instead of alcohol happy hours, we had cocaine happy hours.

Please use logic in your thinking in the future. And please do not go into the field of medicine.

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Alcohol posted on

Kills way more people a year than cocaine does. A simple google will tell you that 85000 people died because of alcohol consumption in 2009. 17000 died because of illicit drug use. 235 deaths were linked to cocaine in 2009.
Now please, tell me, who is the buffoon?

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Alcohol posted on

The 235 is actually referring to the UK. Apologies for that.
I think its about 7000 cocaine related deaths in the US in 2009.

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For real? posted on

Oh goodness.
People think because they scored a 1500 on their SAT they are allowed to debate each and every topic known to man.

Ok, I feel sorry for you so I will take it easy.

You can't compare the number of fatalities to the number of fatalities.

You must compare fatality RATES.

It's also called an attack rate, risk ratio, relative risk, etc.

You can google them if you wish but I doubt you will.

Ok, so how many people use cars? Almost 97% of adults. How many people use cocaine? Less than 10%.

Now imagine if 97% of adults used cocaine, how many deaths do you think there would be?

And if only 10% drove cars, how many fewer deaths would there be?

Now, I will give you the correct numbers for U.S. fatalities. In the U.S. about 35,000 die in automobile accidents per year (some were high on cocaine, actually, lol.)

Your numbers are about correct on cocaine. But throw in there deaths from other illicit drug use and the number surpasses 14,000.

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I called the crimestopppers hotline posted on

Yeah, I'm serious. My name is Lucien Carr. I scored LSD off of Wymbs in Riverside Park. Then he tried to suck my dick, and I deprived him of his future... by calling crimestoppers.

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For real? posted on

Are you serious?

If so, are you willing to give an interview
and go public?

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Alcohol posted on

Alcohol abuse can ruin people's lives and break up families. Cocaine is a party drug taken in club bathrooms. Your calculations might be correct, but that doesn't take away from the fact that many many many more people are negatively affected by alcohol consumption than by cocaine use. Even at Columbia, people are CAVA'd because they drank too muh, not because they snorted too much cocaine. Finally, cocaine is a drug for the wealthy, while alcohol abuse spans across the socio economic spectrum. Cocaine is illegal and there are obviously consequences if you get caught selling it. But maybe we should stop and think about the arbitrariness of drug laws and which substances are illegal and which aren't before we condemn people as somehow morally repugnant for selling a drug that is less likely to kill you than alcohol, a legal substance, is.

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wow posted on

big news, way to break spectrum!

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Throw them in jail posted on

Cocaine is more dangerous than alcohol. LOL.
I hate it when ignorant buffoons open their mouth.

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senior posted on

Can we put the ICH and EC on probation too?

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Alum posted on

ahahha. good point!

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Who called the crimestoppers hotline? posted on

If this was truly a tipster that called a crimestoppers hotline, would they not be a Columbia student?

And who would do that?

Personal vendetta?

Someone who was concerned about the welfare of the student body?

It must have been someone who were among those who came and went at
one or more of the frats.

This story could get even more juicy if this individual stepped forward
and explained why.

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I called the crimestopppers hotline posted on

It was because I don't want no illegal cocaine shit going on in my dorm.

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really? posted on

"dont want no"? you clearly do not go to this school. shut up and stop lying

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I called the crimestopppers hotline posted on

Fine. I'll stop lying. I called crimestoppers cause Wymbs is a privileged douche, and I wanted him expelled.

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Anonymous posted on

People seem to forget that while 4/5 students were in greek life, 2 of the 5 facilities where these deals occurred were not greek housing. While I am not in disagreement with the interim probation of these three chapters, I think it is unfair to just target the greek houses involved and not the ICH or even EC. It is not known yet whether the other members of these students' fraternities were aware of their illegal activity and even that it was occurring in their house. The only rational argument to put these chapters and "houses" on suspension right now is that those who manage the day to day operations of the facilities were unable to prevent and detect the illegal activities and dangers their members imposed on the rest of the community. This same argument should be applied to the ICH and EC housing so that these two facilities must also refrain from any social and "recruiting activities" (i.e. ICH's e-mail earlier today asking for student interest in housing next year) until Columbia can fully investigate where problems arose in preventing these activities from occurring in ALL OF ITS HOUSING. Also, don't forget Greek housing is Columbia housing--since these events occurred in a variety of its housing options, they should all face the same interim punishments and public critique that greek housing does

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cc'11 posted on

People seem to forget that while 4/5 students were in greek life, 2 of the 5 facilities where these deals occurred were not greek housing"

4+2 = 6

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Another cc'11 posted on

you literally added apples (arrested students) and oranges (facilities) there. Nice.

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maybe posted on

if they were just selling pot...

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Alcohol posted on

is more dangerous than any of these substances.

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Really? posted on

all "harboring drug dealers"? really? You think that all of those members and the future of the fraternity should be blamed for one person's actions?

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CC posted on

So, looks like the staff editorial was on the money.

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Throw them in jail posted on

Oh, please. As if this is not going on at their other locations all over the country. I used to pull six footers at on a Grafx bong with cranberry juice at Psi U when I was 15. When I entered college, 12 footer that went from one floor to the 2nd floor. All the pot was purchased from members of the fraternity who lived in the house.

May as well shut down the majority of them in the U.S.

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that posted on

sounds great. If frats are all harboring dealers, then they don't sound like they are living up to their presumed function.

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Throw them in jail posted on

You can read my other comments regarding this story. I've already stated they all need to serve 6 months in prison. Anyone selling cocaine and other hard drugs needs to serve time. However, since marijuana is less dangerous than alcohol, anyone selling it to adults should not go to prison unless they have hundreds of pounds.

Most frats have at least one pot dealer (excluding the frats which house people who do not party much.) This pot dealer may also dabble in ectasy but most do not.

Frat's function is to bring men together to socialize and help them lay more women than otherwise possible. Pot is a socially acceptable method to achieve this goal. While I no longer smoke it, I take no issue with the act and believe it should be decriminalized.

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cc posted on

GOOD.

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yeah posted on

im so glad to see the frats FRYYY they are GONE-ZO

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Unique Situation? posted on

I think its assumed that because its college, people are gonna do some really stupid things, but like others have stated, its really unfair to judge an entire fraternity (namely, each member that didn't participate in the transactions) based upon the actions of a couple people. Granted, it was a dumb decision to bring those people into the frat in the first place, and I'm sure those chapters will have a hell of a time dealing with nationals to explain their recruiting and day to day chapter actions, like why they knowingly kept people in their frat that were drug dealers.

But not all frats are like that. And I would be willing to bet that when college drug busts happen around NYC at student apartments and residences who AREN'T part of the greek system, they don't get half this kind of publicity. Plus, its stupid to think that these three frats accounted for such a huge portion of all drug sales to Columbia students/general public (maybe on another campus that's not in one of the worlds biggest cities.)

And why argue about which drugs are more dangerous? If you abuse (and I'm talking every single day) pot, alcohol, coke, or LSD laced altoids (shown in the pictures) you're making bad choices and are probably gonna end up in the gutter somewhere, or in jail. People react differently to different things as well, so you can't really justify that for every person, they're more likely to get addicted to one drug over another. Plenty of people do coke when they party, but are still able to choose when they use it and don't. People can use pot and become extremely addicted, but I wouldn't say that that's the norm usually.

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